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DAVID DACQUINO CHAIRMAN AND CEO, SERCO INC., HERNDON


The year has been busy for Dacquino, whose company purchased Whitney, Bradley & Brown, a Reston-based federal tech contractor, in May for $295 million. In March, Serco — a subsidi- ary of the U.K.-based Serco Group plc — scored a potential eight-year, $600 million contract from the U.S. Navy to provide anti-terrorism support. The Herndon-based subsidiary employs about 8,000 people in defense, citizen services and transportation.


Dacquino, whose background includes several executive positions at Lockheed Martin, Raytheon and the North American division of VT Group, as well as time spent as president and CEO of SkyLink Aviation Inc., joined Serco in 2015 as its senior vice president of defense services. In 2017, he became the $1.7 billion company’s chairman and CEO. A graduate of Arizona State University with a degree in aeronautical engineering technology and an MBA from California State University at Northridge, Dacquino is a board member of Nathan Associates Inc. and the Greater Washington Board of Trade. In February, he was named a Wash100 Award recipient for the second time.


MIKE DANIELS VICE PRESIDENT, GLOBAL PUBLIC SECTOR, GOOGLE CLOUD, GOOGLE LLC, RESTON


At Google, which he joined in 2019, Daniels leads business development for public sector cloud sales, an $8 billion business. In April, the sector expanded its list of government and security compliance certifications, including Cloud DNS, making more products available to the U.S. gov- ernment and agencies in India, Japan, Australia and Canada.


In 2020, Google Cloud launched several tools


to help government agencies manage communi- cations, customer service and other tasks during the COVID-19 pandemic, and its parent company has expanded its reach in Virginia, particularly in Loudoun County, where Google invested $1.2 billion in data centers and announced in March it plans to invest $600 million more. In a January summit, Daniels predicted that remote work will continue post-pandemic. “2020 has shown us that teams can continue to work, even thrive, without ever meeting in person, and we expect that trend to continue,” he said.


A graduate of The Ohio State and Ohio Northern universities, Daniels previ-


ously oversaw public sector sales at billion-dollar tech businesses Salesforce and Oracle Corp., and he is a member of the Northern Virginia Technology Council board of directors.


WILLIAM H. ‘BILL’ DEAN CEO AND PRESIDENT, M.C. DEAN INC., TYSONS


Dean is the third generation to lead the family busi- ness founded in 1949 by Marion Caleb Dean. Formerly a small electrical firm, M.C. Dean now employs more than 2,000 people in Virginia (among 4,695 total) and earned $1.068 billion in fiscal year 2020. Dean became president and CEO of the company in 1997 and began to expand into design and con- struction work, allowing M.C. Dean to score larger federal contracts. In May, the company announced it had entered the second phase of a $25 million expansion, having bro- ken ground on its 84,000-square-foot plant in Caroline County. Expected to open this fall, the facility will be


home to ModularMEP, M.C. Dean’s line of modular electrical buildings for project sites across the country. M.C. Dean also was one of three companies awarded an $875 million, 10-year contract by the U.S. Air Force to update the power equipment for federal installa- tions worldwide.


Dean was inducted into alma mater


North Carolina State University’s Electrical and Computer Engineering Hall of Fame in 2015. He serves on the Washington Airports Task Force’s board of directors and is a past president and co-founder of the Dulles South Alliance.


PAUL A. DILLAHAY PRESIDENT AND CEO, NCI INFORMATION SYSTEMS INC., RESTON


In his fiſth year at the helm of systems integration company NCI, Dillahay cred- its artificial intelligence adoption with a strong 2021 outlook for the business. In January, the General Services


Administration awarded NCI an $807 million task order to support the GSA’s IT strategy and the adoption of AI, machine learning, automation and other emerg- ing technologies. The contract is the company’s largest award in its 32-year history, with a one-year base and a maximum of seven performance years. A graduate of Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania, Dillahay joined NCI as its CEO in 2016 aſter holding multi- ple executive roles at Lockheed Martin, USIS, GE and CACI International Inc. He also has completed executive education at the Kellogg School of Management and Harvard Business School. In April, he received his third Wash100 award and told ExecutiveBiz that NCI plans to bid on close to $2 billion worth of federal requests for proposals this year. In 2020, NCI reported $268 million in revenue, employing more than 1,000 people.


TINA M. DOLPH PRESIDENT AND CEO, SIEMENS GOVERNMENT TECHNOLOGIES INC., ARLINGTON


For three years in a row, Dolph has won a Wash100 Award for driving federal sector expansion. She joined Siemens’ U.S. government arm as its leader in 2018 aſter a long career in federal contracting, including at Lockheed Martin, ASRC Federal and PAE Inc. A graduate of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Le Moyne College in


New York, Dolph has been involved with the integration of large acquisitions, including Lockheed’s integration and divestiture of PAE and integrating CSC’s applied technologies division into PAE. Before joining Siemens, she served as chief strategy officer at CRDF Global, a nonprofit focused on innovative ways to promote security and stability worldwide. Dolph also serves on the boards of Northern Virginia Technology Council


and Hope for the Warriors, a national organization that provides assistance to wounded veterans and the families of those killed in action. “My dad … taught me what it meant to be successful,” she told Virginia


Business. “It’s not about money or stature but rather the mark you leave on the people around you.”


BEVERAGE OF CHOICE: Any of the amazing red wines offered in our Virginia wineries.


FAVORITE SPORTS TEAM: Philadelphia Eagles


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 65


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