search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
WILLIAM L. BALLHAUS CHAIRMAN, CEO AND PRESIDENT, BLACKBOARD INC., RESTON


Though the pandemic put a spotlight on education tech- nology, Ballhaus has been a quiet player in the market. Now in his fiſth year at Blackboard, for which annual


revenues are now $630 million, Ballhaus remains active on the UCLA Anderson School of Management Board of Advisors and the Great Meadow Foundation board of directors.


The most recent big news for Blackboard was in 2018, when the company hit $700 million in revenues and cut ties with e-learning giant Moodle aſter a six-year partner- ship. Blackboard sold its learning management soſtware to London-based Learning Technologies Group (formerly


TOM BELL CHAIRMAN AND CEO, ROLLS-ROYCE NORTH AMERICA INC.; PRESIDENT, DEFENCE, ROLLS-ROYCE HOLDINGS PLC, RESTON


Bell has led Rolls-Royce North America since 2018 and also oversees the British company’s global defense contracting division, which has 9,000 employees worldwide. Although the name Rolls-Royce for many


invokes the high-end automobile line, Bell’s focus is on military aircraſt. In February 2021, the company received a $96.9 million delivery order for propul- sion systems to support the U.S. Air Force’s C-130J Super Hercules line, running through Jan. 31, 2022. Of particular importance to Virginia is the com- pany’s decision last year to close its Prince George County aircraſt component plant, eliminating 280 jobs there by this summer.


Bell is on a deadline to lower emissions from his operations to net carbon zero by 2030. He has called the effort a “once-in-a-generation opportunity to combat climate change.” A Louisiana State University and Florida Institute of Technology graduate, Bell has more than 35 years of experience in the aerospace and defense industries. He started his career with Martin Marietta (now Lockheed Martin) in human space flight and spent 20 years with The Boeing Co. Bell serves on the boards of the National Defense Industrial Association and the Aerospace Industries Association.


Moodlerooms) for $31.7 million in 2020. Ballhaus has appeared on many distinguished lists


and received prominent awards, including the Top 50 SaaS CEOs of 2017, named by The SaaS Report. A graduate of the University of California at Davis, Ballhaus also has a doctorate in aeronautics and astro- nautics from Stanford University and an MBA from UCLA. He was president and CEO of SRA International before joining Blackboard in 2016 and previously was president and CEO of DynCorp International. Ballhaus also is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.


D. JAMES


BIDZOS CHAIRMAN AND CEO, VERISIGN INC., RESTON


The founder of Verisign, Bidzos is


among the state’s top-earning executives and received more than $10 million in total compensation last year. The company, which serves as a domain name registry and internet infrastructure provider, saw financial improvement in 2021, with a 4% year-over- year increase to $326.9 million in revenue for the second quarter. Having started his career at IBM, Bidzos was previously president and CEO of RSA Security, which was bought by Dell Technologies in 2016. Bidzos also co-founded the RSA Laboratories, a cybersecurity research organization connected to the company, which created early encryption soſtware. Ultimately, RSA’s soſtware became the federal govern- ment’s standard for maintaining cybersecu- rity, as well as for thousands of government contractors. He started Verisign in 1995 and serves as its board’s executive chairman, while still maintaining a foot in RSA as its board vice chairman until 2002.


Bidzos also was named in tech industry trade magazine CRN’s Computer Industry Hall of Fame.


MATT CALKINS CO-FOUNDER, CEO AND EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN, APPIAN CORP., McLEAN


One might say that Calkins’ company keeps the public sector’s digital infrastructure humming. While Appian’s value might come behind the scenes, everyone can see the stock price soar. But the CEO and co-founder of the cloud computing firm that logged $304.6 million in revenue last year said he never set out to reach billion- aire status.


“I was thinking that we could make an organization that not only succeeded as a business but could change the world in a social way,” he recently told the Washington Business Journal. Appian simplifies app development and workflow automation, freeing clients from the need for internal developers. Calkins, who pre- viously worked at MicroStrategy in the late 1990s, co-founded Appian in 1999 with Michael Beckley, the company’s chief technology officer. The business employs about 1,200 people. Calkins, a top competitor at the World Boardgaming Championships, has also created award-winning board games, including Sekigahara: The Unification of Japan and Tin Goose. Closer to home, the Dartmouth College alumnus serves on the Northern Virginia Technology Council board and the Virginia Public Access Project’s Leadership Council.


JENNIFER BOYKIN PRESIDENT, NEWPORT NEWS SHIPBUILDING; VICE PRESIDENT, HUNTINGTON INGALLS INDUSTRIES, NEWPORT NEWS


As the 135-year-old company’s first female president, Boykin has seen ups and downs since 2017, when she took the reins of Newport News Shipbuilding, the nation’s largest military shipbuilding company and the state’s top industrial employer, with more than 26,000 workers. In 2019, NNS, which is owned by


Huntington Ingalls, was awarded part of the U.S. Navy’s largest shipbuilding con- tract, worth $22.2 billion. With General Dynamic Electric Boat, the shipbuilder is building 10 Virginia-class submarines, up from nine in the original contract. In March, the Biden administration ordered a 10th submarine, bumping up NNS’ share of the contract to $9.8 billion. However, one month earlier, Boykin laid off 314 staffers and demoted 119 manag- ers as a cost-management measure, NNS’ first layoffs since 2015. Currently, the NNS yard’s biggest proj-


ect is the USS John F. Kennedy, the second aircraſt carrier in the Navy’s new Gerald R. Ford class of nuclear-powered carriers that will replace Nimitz-class ships. A graduate of the U.S. Merchant


Marine Academy and George Washington University, Boykin serves on the acad- emy’s board of visitors, as well as the boards of the Mariners’ Museum and RVA 757 Connects.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 63


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196