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FEDERAL CONTRACTORS/TECHNOLOGY


CRAIG P. ABOD PRESIDENT, CARAHSOFT TECHNOLOGY CORP., RESTON


Abod has built Carahsoſt into a $6 billion company over the past 17 years. With 1,900 employees, Abod has led Carahsoſt to become a top-ranked General Services Administration schedule and NASA’s Solution for Enterprise-Wide Procurement (SEWP) contract holder that provides solutions to more than 3,000 prime contractors, value-added resellers, system integrators and other channel partners.


The company recently started working with Amazon Web Services and the data storage company Buurst to help public sector organizations aggregate data quickly and securely migrate those workloads to advanced AWS cloud-native services. Last year, Carahsoſt landed an $81 million Air Force contract for the Space Command and Control Division. That came aſter a $1.5 billion purchase agree- ment to provide soſtware products and licenses to the U.S. Navy in 2019, as well as $247.7 million in cloud computing support services for the U.S. Army. A University of Maryland graduate with his bachelor’s degree in computer science, Abod was named the EY Entrepreneur of the Year for the greater Washington, D.C., area in 2015. He previously worked for DLT Solutions and Falcon Systems before founding Carahsoſt in 2004. He also serves on the executive committee of the Government Business Executive Forum.


MAHFUZ AHMED CHAIRMAN, CEO AND PRINCIPAL FOUNDER, DIGITAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS LLC (DISYS), McLEAN


In a sea of staffing firms, Ahmed’s company stands out. Most in the industry suffered slumps of more than 10% last year, but DISYS reported 3% year-over-year growth due to clientele in the pharmaceutical, insurance and


banking industries. Earlier this year, DISYS acquired the legal entities of Signature. With com- bined annual revenues of $860 million, the transaction created one of the largest providers of information technology staffing services in the U.S. and the nation’s second-largest minority-owned staffing firm.


Ahmed, who co-founded the company in 1994 while working for Northrop Grumman, is credited with leadership and vision that fueled his recent success, which earned him a place on Staffing Industry Analysts’ list of the most influential people in staffing for four years. This comes aſter a decade of consistent growth to become one of the largest staffing firms in the U.S., with 45 offices worldwide. And Ahmed isn’t stopping there. He’s leading expansion into the Canadian market space with a new headquarters in Toronto, and he’s investing in tools to support remote work for DISYS’ 5,000 employees around the world. A George Mason University and Harvard Business School graduate, Ahmed is a


native of Bangladesh.


TOM ARSENEAULT PRESIDENT AND CEO, BAE SYSTEMS INC., ARLINGTON


While some CEOs are proud just to have survived the pandemic, Arseneault thrived — during his first year at the helm no less. Last year, the $11.9 billion British defense company purchased Raytheon Technology Corp.’s former GPS and airborne tactical radios


businesses for $2.2 billion and began integrating the two later in the year. In September, Arseneault will take over as the vice chair of the Defense Industry Initiative. He was promoted to his current role aſter 22 years with BAE, which employs 5,400 people in Virginia and 35,000 worldwide and ranks among the top 10 prime contractors to the U.S. Department of Defense. Arseneault joined BAE aſter the company purchased Sanders, a division of Lockheed Martin, in 2000. He previously served in engineering and program management positions with General Electric and TASC. The Worcester Polytechnic Institute and Boston University alumnus also serves on the Aerospace Industries Association Board of Governors Executive Committee, and he is a two-time recipient of Executive Mosaic’s Wash100 award.


62 VIRGINIA 500


ROY AZEVEDO PRESIDENT, RAYTHEON INTELLIGENCE & SPACE AT RAYTHEON TECHNOLOGIES CORP., ARLINGTON


Azevedo told Forbes that Raytheon Intelligence & Space has some of the “coolest” technologies on the planet. Unfortunately, they must remain a secret. That’s because his unit, created with the largest-ever aerospace merger, primarily serves the U.S. Department of Defense. That’s also why it remained solid enough to celebrate its first birthday in April despite a suffering industry. Still, the achievement requires adept leadership that in April earned Azevedo his second Wash100 Award, for leading and advancing space technology and other technical capabilities to assist the U.S. military advancements as well as drive company growth. Before the merger, he was vice president and general manager of the company’s intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance systems business. He also sits on the boards of Raytheon’s business arms in the U.K., Australia and Saudi Arabia. Azevedo is a graduate of Northeastern University, with a degree in electrical engineering. With $15 billion in annual revenues and 39,000 employees in the U.S. and


abroad, the unit does more imagery collection and processing than any other com- pany worldwide, according to a recent article in Forbes. In December 2020, Raytheon purchased Blue Canyon Technologies, which is now part of Azevedo’s unit.


REGGIE AGGARWAL FOUNDER AND CEO, CVENT INC., McLEAN


Last year was a terrible year for most businesses, let alone a market leader in meetings and events. But Aggarwal has come back from the brink of disaster with Cvent, which now pulls in $840 million in revenue. Aſter laying off 10% of its workforce in 2020, the company has launched a new virtual-driven product and a strategic partnership with Encore, a leading global event-production company. They combine technology and production capabilities to create virtual and hybrid events. “Going forward, you’ll need to do hybrid for any large conference because you get a large audience that won’t come otherwise, whether because of conve- nience, travel budget, overall costs, etc.,” Aggarwal said in a statement. Aggarwal leſt a stable law career to launch


Cvent in 1999, when he saw a need to make meeting planning easier for the CEOs with whom he formed a networking group. When the dot-com bubble burst, his early success was plunged into near bankruptcy, but Aggarwal rebounded. Now privately held through Vista Equity Partners, Cvent has grown to nearly 4,000 employees, 23,000 customers and 230,000 users worldwide. In July, the company announced it will merge with a blank check company to go public again in the fourth quarter of 2021.


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