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GLENN DuBOIS CHANCELLOR, VIRGINIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM, RICHMOND


The longest-serving chancellor in the Virginia Community College System’s 55-year history, DuBois is himself a community college graduate who has led the organization since 2001, seeing it through three strategic plans and into its fourth, Opportunity 2027. In August, DuBois announced he plans to retire in June 2022, aſter having built the college


system into the state's leading provider of workforce training. In addition to helping community colleges navigate the pandemic, DuBois played an integral role in establishing Gov. Ralph Northam’s G3 (Get a Skill. Get a Job. Get Ahead.) program, which helps fully pay


tuition for low- and moderate-income Virginians pursuing degrees in high-demand fields. In May 2020, DuBois announced the launch of CollegeAnywhereVA.org, an online portal connecting students with affordable online courses and advisers who can streamline application and course enrollment processes. DuBois is a supporter of the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education, which he founded. He also founded the Great Expectations program for foster youth through the foundation. He sits on the boards of VFCCE, Rebuilding America’s Middle Class, Virginia529 and the Virginia Space Grant Consortium. Virginia’s 23 community colleges employ roughly 18,000 faculty and staff members each year, serving a combined 250,000 individuals.


KEVIN F. HALLOCK PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND, RICHMOND


An economist and compensation and labor market scholar, Hallock took the helm at UR on Aug. 15, 2021. His leadership of the university comes on the heels of a pandemic year that also saw controversy erupt aſter the UR board of trustees decided in February and March to retain the names of two buildings named for his- torical figures who had enslaved people and supported racial segregation. Following an uproar, the board announced in April it would “suspend” its decision. Hallock’s predecessor, Ronald A. Crutcher, the school’s first Black president, had spoken in favor of the board’s initial decision. Prior to joining UR, Hallock served as the dean of Cornell University’s SC Johnson College of


TRACY FITZSIMMONS PRESIDENT, SHENANDOAH UNIVERSITY, WINCHESTER


As Shenandoah University’s 16th president, Fitzsimmons leads an institution of 4,200 students and 900 faculty and staff at its 129-acre campus in Winchester, as well as sites in Clarke, Fairfax and Loudoun counties. During the pandemic, SU saw its highest enrollment ever, continued in-person instruction uninterrupted and experienced no layoffs, furloughs or salary cuts. The university’s phar- macy school developed a COVID-19 saliva test to randomly sample asymp- tomatic students, and the pharmacy faculty sequenced samples to identify variants. The school also hosted a mass vaccination site, providing more than 70,000 shots. Fitzsimmons serves on the boards of Shenandoah Telecommunications Inc. and GO Virginia’s Region 8 council. She is a past president of the Old Dominion Athletic Conference, past chair of the Council of Independent Colleges in Virginia and past president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities. She also serves on the boards of the Loudoun Education Foundation and Blue Ridge Region BB&T Bank. Fitzsimmons graduated magna cum laude from Princeton University, earning a bachelor’s degree in politics. She also earned master’s and doctoral degrees from Stanford University in Latin American studies and political science, respectively.


Business. During his time at Cornell, he also chaired the Department of Economics in the College of Arts and Sciences and in the School of Industrial and Labor Relations. Hallock graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University


of Massachusetts Amherst and earned his master’s degree and doctorate in economics from Princeton University.


WILLIAM R.


HARVEY PRESIDENT, HAMPTON UNIVERSITY, HAMPTON


In the world of aca- demia, few presidents have had the longevity


of Harvey, who has served since 1978 as president of Hampton University, a historically Black school founded in 1868 to provide education to freedmen. In December 2020, the university announced that Harvey would retire in June 2022 aſter more than four decades as president. He is the eighth longest-serving university president currently serving in the United States and the 28th longest-serving in U.S. history. During his tenure, Hampton has launched 92 academic degrees, added 29 buildings to its campus and grown its endowment from $29 million to more than $300 million. In July 2020, the university received its largest-ever donation, a $30 million giſt from philanthropist MacKenzie Scott, ex-wife of Amazon.com Inc. founder and Executive Chairman Jeff Bezos. The president and full owner of the Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. of Houghton, Michigan, Harvey has said he would like to explore developing a slavery museum aſter retirement. He and his wife, Norma, have donated more than $8.5 million to the university. Its William R. Harvey Leadership Institute bears his name, the main thoroughfare through the 314-acre campus is William Harvey Way and the library is named for the Harveys.


BRIAN O.


HEMPHILL PRESIDENT, OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY, NORFOLK


In February, Old Dominion University


announced that Radford University President Brian Hemphill had been selected as ODU’s ninth president, succeeding John Broderick, the univer- sity’s president of 13 years. Hemphill, who has led Radford since 2016, takes the helm as ODU is partnering with Norfolk State University to develop a regional School of Public Health. It’s something he definitely knows about.


In 2019, Hemphill negotiated a merger with the Jefferson College of Health Sciences and a partnership with Roanoke-based Carilion Clinic to create Radford University Carilion. Radford’s nursing program is now the second largest in Virginia.


During Hemphill’s tenure, Radford also


received its largest-ever individual and alumni giſts, while growing its endowment by $20 mil- lion. Radford also saw its total enrollment reach a record 11,870 students in fall 2019, and the school received $101 million in state funding for the largest capital project in Radford history, its Artis Center for Adaptive Innovation and Creativity. Before joining Radford, Hemphill was presi-


dent of West Virginia State University. He received his doctorate in higher education administration and policy studies from the University of Iowa.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 49


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