search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
L. DOUGLAS WILDER FORMER GOVERNOR, COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, CHARLES CITY COUNTY


At age 90, when many political lions have faded into the background, Wilder continues to roar. Virginia’s only Black elected governor, Wilder accused Democratic gubernatorial nominee Terry McAuliffe in July of flip-flopping on the blackface scandal that engulfed Gov. Ralph Northam and impacted Attorney Gen. Mark Herring. Wilder also pressed Northam to use $50 million from the state’s $4.3 billion in federal stimulus funds to invest in Virginia’s historically Black colleges and universities.


A Richmond native and the grandson of enslaved people, Wilder is a Virginia Union


and Howard University alumnus and earned a Bronze Star in the Korean War. Aſter becoming the first Black Virginia state senator since Reconstruction, Wilder was the first Black person to win statewide office in Virginia as lieutenant governor, and he was the first popularly elected Black governor in the nation. Post-governorship, he was elected mayor of Richmond. In 2001, Wilder began raising funds to build the United States National Slavery


Museum in Fredericksburg, but it remains unbuilt and has been dogged by delinquent property taxes. In 2004, Virginia Commonwealth University named the L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs in his honor, and he remains a distinguished professor there.


JOE


Living Legends PAST


HONOREES 2020-21


Giuseppe Cecchi The IDI Group Cos., McLean


Marjorie “Marge” Connelly


State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, Charlottesville


William E. Conway Jr. The Carlyle Group, McLean


WILSON CEO EMERITUS, PERMATREAT PEST AND TERMITE CONTROL, FREDERICKSBURG


Buena Vista native Wilson rose through the ranks of Orkin Pest Control, where he started in the 1960s as a young graduate of Washington and Lee University. In 1982, aſter Wilson was responsible for 13 states in Orkin’s Midwest region, he bought Fredericksburg-based PermaTreat Pest Control in a handshake deal. Owned by Rollings Inc., the company had $12 million in revenue last year and employs 88 people in Virginia. A former Fredericksburg City Council member, Wilson is deeply involved in civic organizations. He chairs the Mary Washington Hospital Foundation board and is a member of the state’s GO Virginia board. He and his wife, Mary, endowed a professorship in entomology at Virginia Tech.


FIRST JOB: Paper route (delivering The Richmond News Leader) at age 11.


WHAT I WAS LIKE IN HIGH SCHOOL: Seventh in a class of 61. Voted most flirtatious.


PERSON I ADMIRE: Former Gov. Jerry Baliles. He was a huge supporter of the community college system.


FAVORITE VACATION DESTINATION: Hometown Buena Vista, fishing the Maury River.


SOMETHING I’LL NEVER DO AGAIN: I would spend more time with my children as they grew up, as opposed to being so involved with work.


ALAN S.


Daniel A. D’Aniello The Carlyle Group, McLean


WITT DEAN, LUTER SCHOOL OF BUSINESS, CHRISTOPHER NEWPORT UNIVERSITY, NEWPORT NEWS


In January, upon his retirement aſter 42 years as CEO of Newport News-based top 100 accounting firm PBMares LLP, Witt was elected to chair the Virginia Chamber of Commerce’s board of directors. And he didn’t slow down from there. In August, Witt was named dean of the Luter School of Business at Christopher Newport University, his alma mater.


A former CNU rector, Witt helped form the business school and served as executive in residence there this year. He earned his bachelor’s degree in business administration from CNU, with a con- centration in accounting, in 1976. In 1979, Witt co-founded PBMares, where he remains a partner. The firm, which earned $49.1 million in revenue in 2019 and employs 255 people, has offices in Virginia, Maryland and North Carolina.


A former Newport News City Council member, Witt also was a member of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge and Tunnel Commission and the Commonwealth Transportation Board, as well as former chair of Riverside Health System’s board. In November, PBMares committed to provide college scholarships for 2021 graduates of An Achievable Dream, a program that assists underserved Newport News students. They will be known as the Alan S. Witt scholars.


Andrew Fine The Runnymede Corp., Virginia Beach


Morris Fine The Runnymede Corp., Virginia Beach


Richard B. Gilliam The Richard and Leslie Gilliam Foundation, Keswick


William H. “Bill” Goodwin Jr. Riverstone Group LLC, Richmond


John T. “Til” Hazel Jr. Developer, Broad Run


Daniel A. Hoffler Armada Hoffler Properties Inc., Cape Charles


Winifred Johnson- Marquart The Johnson Family Foundation, Virginia Beach


Bobbie G. Kilberg Northern Virginia Technology Council, McLean


Alan I. Kirshner Markel Corp., Richmond


Harvey L. Lindsay Jr. Harvey Lindsay Commercial Real Estate, Norfolk


John A. Luke Jr. WestRock Co., Richmond


Jacqueline Mars Mars Inc., The Plains


Pamela Mars- Wright Mars Inc., Alexandria


Charles W. “Wick” Moorman Amtrak, Charlottesville


Bob Sasser Dollar Tree Stores, Chesapeake


Stuart C. Siegel S&K Famous Brands Inc., Richmond


John Stallings* Union Bank and Trust, Richmond


James E. “Jim” Ukrop New Richmond Ventures, Richmond


U.S. Sen. John Warner III* U.S. Senate, Alexandria


John O. “Dubby” Wynne Landmark


Communications Inc., Virginia Beach


*Deceased


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 27


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196