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DAN CLEMENTE CHAIRMAN AND CEO, CLEMENTE DEVELOPMENT CO. INC., VIENNA


STEVE CASE CHAIRMAN AND CEO, REVOLUTION LLC, WASHINGTON, D.C.


Forbes estimates America Online co-founder Case’s net worth at about $1.5 billion. He’s best known for founding and leading AOL, the com- pany that paved the way for today’s internet culture. Today, Case champions talented innovators and entrepreneurs through his Washington, D.C.-based investment company Revolution LLC and through his work with other foundations and partnerships. Since 2005, Revolution has


invested about $1 billion in seed and growth funds into companies that fall outside of Silicon Valley and New York; its Rise of the Rest pitch competition tours the nation, award- ing promising startups $100,000 to launch or grow. In April, Case wrote an essay for The Hill in support of a bill that would use federal funds to set up regional tech hubs across the U.S. In 2018, Case sold his McLean estate, the childhood home of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, to the Saudi Arabia government for $43 million. His wife, Jean, is chair- man of the National Geographic Society and owns Early Mountain Vineyards in Madison. Steve Case is also chairman of the


Case Foundation, which partnered with the Kauffman Foundation to launch Startup America Partnership, which has helped more than 13,000 small businesses since 2011.


For nearly half a century, Clemente has been instrumental in shaping Northern Virginia. Even as he developed residential and commercial projects, particularly in the Tysons area, Clemente also spurred the growth of higher education in the region. He was instrumental in helping George Mason University grow from a small school in 1972, when it was accepted into Virginia’s system of colleges and universities, into the largest public research university in the state, with 37,000 students and


four campuses. During the same era, Clemente developed the state’s first condominium project, the Tower Villas in Arlington.


In fall 2019, his company won approval to build a $1.3 billion complex, The View at Tysons, which includes condos, a hotel, an arts center, and office and retail space; it’s set to be capped by a tower billed as the tallest building in the state. The project was paused during the pandemic. Clemente also serves on the board of directors governing the Virginia Economic Development


Partnership.


JAMES W. ‘JIM’ DYKE JR. SENIOR ADVISOR, STATE GOVERNMENT RELATIONS, MCGUIREWOODS CONSULTING LLC, TYSONS


Dyke was a Howard University math major in 1963 when he attended the March on Washington and was moved by Dr. Martin Luther King’s dream. “My life’s path was forever altered,” he wrote in an


April essay for Washington Business Journal. “They were my dreams stated so eloquently that I could not deny their truth. Only government and law could assure the availability of education and economic opportunities for all and effect fundamental and imper- ative social change.”


Dyke switched courses and ultimately graduated as valedictorian of Howard University’s law school in 1971, launching his half-century pursuit of social justice and opportunity. He served as Gov. L. Douglas Wilder’s secretary of education, worked as a domestic policy adviser to Vice President Walter Mondale and was instrumental in opening Virginia Military Institute to women aſter a landmark 1996 U.S. Supreme Court deci- sion struck down VMI's males-only admissions policy. Dyke's clients include George Washington University and the George Mason University Foundation. This year, he and Wilder have called for increased state funding for all of Virginia’s historically Black colleges and universities, including private institu- tions, and Dyke has collaborated on a McGuireWoods project demonstrating how zoning is connected to racial segregation.


BARBARA FRIED OWNER, FRIED COS. INC., CROZET


Fried was the first in her family to graduate from col- lege, and when she attended the University of Chicago law school in the 1950s, she was one of just five women. She and her late husband, Mark, founded the Fried


and Fried law firm in 1962, specializing in real estate law and later launching an Albemarle County-based real estate development company. They created residential developments and com- mercial centers and also gave their time and money to philanthropy, including founding Innisfree Village, a residential community in Albemarle for adults with intellectual disabilities, and Charlottesville-Albemarle


Riding Therapy, a horseback riding program for disabled adults and children. Fried also has supported efforts to make Virginia’s community and state college system accessible. The Fried family in 2015 donated $1 million to Germanna Community College, which in 2019 opened the Barbara J. Fried Center, which offers transfer programs including cybersecurity, nursing and business administration. Fried is on the University of Virginia board of visitors, and she has served as chairman of the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the Sorensen Institute's statewide advisory board.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 23


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