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SCOTT WHEELER CHAIRMAN, VIRGINIA MARITIME ASSOCIATION; CEO, BAY DIESEL & GENERATOR CORP., VIRGINIA BEACH


Wheeler grew up in St. Louis and moved to Virginia in the early 1970s following his service in the U.S. Army. He worked first for Virginia Tractor


Co. before starting Bay Diesel in 1982. The company overhauls and repairs engines for oceangoing vessels, while also selling and servicing industrial generators. Wheeler moved from president to CEO in December 2020. He also continues to lead the board of the Virginia Maritime Association, which looks out for the interests of about 500 Virginia companies in the maritime industry. In a 2018 Virginian-Pilot essay, Wheeler wrote, “My philosophy is simple — show up, work hard, stay informed and make good decisions.” Outside of work, Wheeler serves on the governing boards


of WHRO Public Media and the World Affairs Council of Greater Hampton Roads, as well as the regional advisory board for Truist Bank, created from the merger of SunTrust and BB&T banks.


PAUL J. WIEDEFELD GENERAL MANAGER AND CEO, WASHINGTON METROPOLITAN AREA TRANSIT AUTHORITY, WASHINGTON, D.C.


With the number of Metrorail and Metrobus riders plunging by 90% last year during the height of the pandemic, it was a challenging time to lead the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. Wiedefeld, who joined the agency in 2015 aſter serving as CEO of the Baltimore- Washington International Airport, has spent the past six years leading Metro’s aggressive expansion and renovation program, particularly on the Dulles-bound Silver Line, as well as balancing its budget during the pandemic.


As of mid-2021, ridership has yet to


recover, as telecommuters walk to their home offices rather than ride Metro’s trains and buses, but federal stimulus funding has staved off major job cuts and shorter hours. To attract more riders, Wiedefeld asked his board in June to reduce fares, decrease wait times between trains and extend hours. Still, Metro projects only about a third of pre-pandemic commuters will return this summer, and it expects to be carrying about 75% of its former passengers in three years. Wiedefeld, who has a master’s degree in city and regional planning from Rutgers University, previ- ously was CEO of the Maryland Transit Administration and consulted with Parsons Brinckerhoff.


WILLIAM E. ‘BILL’ WOODHOUR PRESIDENT AND CEO, MAERSK LINE LTD., LEESBURG


Woodhour is


president and CEO of the U.S. arm of the world’s largest shipping company, A.P. Moller-Maersk. Maersk Line, a Norfolk-based sub- sidiary, was founded


in 1983 to support the U.S. Navy. Its 20 container vessels operate around the world in support of U.S. military, government and humanitarian mis- sions. It also serves commercial customers. Woodhour took Maersk Line’s helm in 2016 following a nearly 25-year career with the parent company. He has worked in marketing, sales, and line management, and prior to his promotion,


Woodhour was a vice president in A.P. Moller- Maersk’s headquarters in Copenhagen. Maersk ships from more than 300 ports and has the largest fleet of U.S.-flagged ocean vessels. The U.S. line is based in Norfolk and employs about 3,500 mariners. In March, as the massive Ever Green container ship created a traffic jam at the Suez Canal for nearly a week, Maersk noted that the stuck ship would result in global backlogs, and the parent company anticipates high demand and earnings to continue the rest of 2021. Woodhour, who earned degrees at the


University of Delaware and attended Harvard Business School’s Advanced Management Program, serves as vice chairman of the National Defense Transportation Association board.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 191


DAVID C. WHITE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, VIRGINIA MARITIME ASSOCIATION, NORFOLK


White, who joined the VMA in 2003, is responsible for making sure both Virginia’s congressional delegation and its state leaders understand the concerns of the nearly 500 maritime companies that make up the association’s membership. He also serves as executive


vice president of the Hampton Roads Shipping Association, which negotiates the collective bargaining agreement with the International Longshoremen’s Association, a crucial part of keeping Virginia’s maritime industry working. In 2020, shippers were faced with unprecedented challenges as the pandemic disrupted the global economy while demand soared for vital goods. It was time to encourage creativity, flexibility and adaptability, White says. The VMA has worked in recent years to expand its membership, opening chap- ters in Southern and Northern Virginia and the Shenandoah Valley, a network that helped meet members’ needs during the fluctuations in volume, White says. Aside from work, the William & Mary alumnus is a member of the WHRO


Public Media board and the Elizabeth River Project environmental cleanup effort. He also chairs the Virginia Freight Transportation Advisory Committee, a group created in 2020 to advise the state on freight and logistics infrastructure and technology.


ROLF A. WILLIAMS OWNER, ANDERS WILLIAMS & CO. INC.; VICE PRESIDENT, VIRGINIA MARITIME ASSOCIATION, NORFOLK


Williams is the third generation to steer his family’s shipping business. He wears three hats as president of both Anders Williams Ship Agency and Anders Williams Trucking and as executive vice president of Marine Oil Service, which is based in Norfolk and New York. The William & Mary alumnus has been on the board of the Virginia Maritime Association since 2013 and is one of three vice presidents, while also serving on the board of the Hampton Roads Shipping Association. One of the VMA’s major efforts is encouraging expansion in the Hampton Roads area to make the Port of Virginia and associated shipping stations hospitable for larger craſts by dredging the Norfolk Harbor. The association also joined other groups to develop a comprehensive infrastruc- ture package to improve ports, water- ways and freight movement projects in order to secure funding for Virginia in President Joe Biden’s proposed $1.2 trillion infrastructure plan. Williams, who trained in shipping


in Norway, has served on several Norfolk boards and also is Virginia’s honorary consul for Norway and Sweden and dean of the Consular Corps of Virginia.


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