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STEPHEN C. BRICH COMMISSIONER, VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, RICHMOND


Virginia kept moving, even during a worldwide pandemic. Brich credits the General Assembly for granting VDOT, which has a budget of about $6.4 billion, the financial flexibility to allow work to keep flowing. An alumnus of Old Dominion University and the University of


Virginia, Brich was an intern in the city of Norfolk’s traffic engineering division, which paved the road for his future work. Currently, he is overseeing the state’s largest-ever infrastructure project, the $3.8 billion Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel expansion. In May, the project hit a milestone when the 350-foot-long Tunnel


Boring Machine being constructed for the project — nicknamed “Mary” for former NASA scientist Mary Winston Jackson — passed a virtual factory


GEORGE BROWN PRESIDENT AND CEO, CP&O LLC; VICE PRESIDENT, VIRGINIA MARITIME ASSOCIATION, NORFOLK


The Norfolk native spent a decade working as a longshoreman —fol- lowing in the footsteps of his father and grandfather — aſter spending three years in the Army, retiring as a sergeant in 1975. Brown then graduated from Old Dominion University on the G.I. Bill and switched over to management. Brown has led CP&O, a partnership between Cooper/T.


Smith and Ports America, since 2004. The company handles stevedoring and terminal services at major ports across Hampton Roads. At any given time, it employs between about 75 and 300 longshoremen. May was among the busiest months for the company, Brown says, attributing the high volume to “just pent-up demand, pent-up volume overseas getting here. Just bigger ships, and more containers.” Prior to leading CP&O, Brown served as a senior vice president for East Coast operations for Cooper/T. Smith. In his spare time, he enjoys golfing. His first jobs, at 11 years old, were delivering the morning newspaper and cutting grass. In addition to his work at CP&O, Brown serves on the boards of the Hampton Roads Shipping Association and the Virginia Maritime Association, and he previously served as treasurer of the National Maritime Safety Association.


acceptance test. Mary is expected to arrive in Hampton Roads from Germany in November, with boring set to start in early 2022. Also in May, the state awarded a $170 million design-build contract for improvements along Interstate 81 in the Salem Construction District. By mid-2021, truck traffic was about 10% above pre-COVID levels,


although Northern Virginia is still seeing decreased volumes, which Brich attributed to the federal government remaining in telework status. Elsewhere, “it’s rebounded and then some,” he says.


HOBBIES: Surfing, boating, fishing


PIERCE COFFEE PRESIDENT, NORTH AMERICA, TRANSURBAN, FALLS CHURCH


In February, Coffee was promoted to president of Transurban’s North American operations, which manage express lanes along Interstates 95, 395 and 495 in Northern Virginia. Before stepping up to replace Jennifer Aument, who leſt to lead AECOM’s global transportation business, Coffee served as vice president of customer experience and operations. In that role, she was responsible for customer service, tolling, account management and enforcement operations. She joined the Australian company in 2009 aſter holding leadership roles at Qorvis Communications LLC and Visual CV. She also previously led Transurban’s marketing department from the compa- ny’s Australian headquarters before returning to the U.S. In June, Transurban got a little closer to expand- ing its operations into Maryland when the state’s Transportation Authority approved the firm to develop toll lanes on Interstate 95 in order to ease congestion around the Washington, D.C., suburbs. The company will operate and maintain express lanes and charge toll rates in a contract that extends until 2087. Coffee has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Virginia, where she played club lacrosse.


ADAM COHEN and ELAN COHEN CO-EXECUTIVE CHAIRMEN, LIBERIAN INTERNATIONAL SHIP & CORPORATE REGISTRY (LISCR) LLC, DULLES


The Cohen brothers run Liberian International Ship & Corporate Registry, which was founded by their father, Yoram, in 1999. With more than 4,800 vessels — which comprise more than 200 million gross tons — it represents 13% of the world’s ship- ping fleet, according to the company. In April 2021, the company announced it had launched new platforms to help improve access for seafarers taking licensing examinations and apply-


ing for documents and credentials, The Maritime Executive reported. LISCR Chief Operating Officer Alfonso Castillero says the advancements were more important than ever, considering the challenges brought by the pandemic.


“These new platforms are a key part of Liberia’s continued implementation of technology,” Castillero says. “This time of COVID-19 and the continued restric- tion of travel has continued to necessitate the industry to continue to think out- side the box and adapt to allow for technology to be used whenever possible. “ In 2013, the company’s $120,000 donation to former Gov. Terry McAuliffe, the Democratic candidate in this year’s race, led to questions because of the unusual alliance, The Washington Post reported then. The company also faced questions for its business during the regime of former Liberian President Charles Taylor.


MICHAEL W. COLEMAN PRESIDENT AND CEO, CV INTERNATIONAL INC.; PRESIDENT, VIRGINIA MARITIME ASSOCIATION, NORFOLK


Coleman grew up with the family business, launched by his father, B. Wayne Coleman, in 1985. “It was always in my mind that ... I wanted to be like him and wanted to run the


business one day,” he says. Coleman became CV International’s president in 2006 and CEO


in 2018. Working summers during high school and college for the supply chain business, he says he was fascinated by the diversity of products and industries he was working with. “We’re dealing with people all over the world and helping people move their products all over the world, dealing with so many different industries and so many different commodities,” Coleman says. Following a huge surge in volume related to the pandemic,


CV International added about 18 employees in the past year, bring- ing its total to 88, with 53 based in Virginia. Coleman is a member of the Hampton Roads Coal Association,


serves on the Hampton Roads Shipping Association and Greater Norfolk Corp. boards, and was appointed to the Virginia Board for Branch Pilots. He became president of the Virginia Maritime Association in 2020 and in 2021 was appointed to the Virginia Freight Advisory Committee.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 187


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