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TRANSPORTATION


ED ALDRIDGE PRESIDENT, CMA CGM AMERICA LLP AND APL NORTH AMERICA, NORFOLK


Aldridge took over as president of CMA CGM America in June 2020, and he has served as presi- dent of CMA CGM subsidiary North America, the nation’s oldest ocean carrier, since 2017.


In February, the French company announced the $36 million expansion


of its Hampton Roads and Northern Virginia operations, adding 400 jobs. Many of those jobs are expected to be in Hampton Roads; in Arlington, the firm will open Zebox, a startup incubator. Aldridge is responsible for CMA CGM’s U.S. operations and 11,000 employees at 18 ports. Then in May, the largest-ever cargo ship to call on the East Coast arrived


at the Port of Virginia in Portsmouth. At the length of about three-and-a- half football fields, the Marco Polo, operated by CMA CGM, holds enough containers that they would span more than 61 miles if put end-to-end. “We think about it in terms of our customers,” Aldridge said in an inter-


view with the Richmond Times-Dispatch. “Every one of those containers is a customer we focus on. There are over 10,000 customers on that ship.” A Marist College alumnus, Aldridge started his maritime career with SeaLand Service and was CEO and president of US Lines, which became part of CMA CGM.


DEVON ANDERS PRESIDENT, INTERCHANGE GROUP INC., MOUNT CRAWFORD


In September 2020, InterChange Group Inc. purchased a minority stake in the 22-mile privately owned Shenandoah Valley Railroad, part of a larger expansion plan for the third-


party logistics company. The line will ultimately connect its cold storage warehouse to the Virginia Inland Port system in Front Royal. An Eastern Mennonite University alumnus, Anders has led InterChange for more than two decades.


The firm has a building portfolio of almost 2 million square feet, including a 250,000-square-foot cold storage facility off Interstate 81 in Mount Crawford that has room to grow to 600,000 square feet. A third phase of expansion is scheduled soon, Anders said late last year. Anders is also a director on the Virginia Maritime Association board, as well as a member of GO Virginia Region 8 Council, which boosts economic development in the northern Shenandoah Valley. InterChange has made a commitment to solar power in the past, and Anders announced in July that it would add an array to its new cold storage facility, giving InterChange the ability to offset 70% of the structure’s energy usage.


ADAM ANDERSON CHAIRMAN AND CEO, T. PARKER HOST, NORFOLK


Anderson, a former Army reservist who joined the century-old shipping firm T. Parker Host in 1998 as a boarding agent, developed and negotiated its first terminal operation contract by the time he was 24, according to the company. He has served as its chief executive for a decade. He has overseen fast growth for the company, which opened a logistics division in 2017 and the following year acquired the former Avondale Shipyard in Louisiana through a joint partnership. Host has begun an overhaul of the yard in recent months, and with $10 million in federal block grant funding, the former wharf will be converted into a modern cargo dock. Host has approximately 70 Virginia-based employees and more than 490 worldwide, and in 2018 and 2019, it made the Inc. 5000 list of the nation’s fastest-growing privately owned companies. In 2020, Host was the oldest company listed on the Virginia Chamber’s Fantastic 50 list, marking 245% growth between 2015 and 2018. Anderson, who regularly speaks about the maritime sector at industry events, is a member of the Coal Institute, the New York Coal Trade Association, the Pittsburgh Traffic Club, the Virginia Maritime Association and the Hampton Roads Coal Association.


JENNIFER AUMENT CHIEF EXECUTIVE, GLOBAL TRANSPORTATION, AECOM, ARLINGTON


Aument joined the Fortune 500 Los Angeles- based infrastructure consulting firm in April, working out of its Arlington office. Aument manages transportation proj- ects around the world for AECOM, which provides planning, design and engineering services for transportation and building projects, as well as water and energy facil- ities. Past AECOM projects include the Los


Angeles International Airport’s expansion and a new subway line in New York City. AECOM reported $13.2 billion in revenue last year. Before joining AECOM, Aument was president of North America operations for Transurban, which operates the dynami- cally tolled Express Lanes along interstates 95, 395 and 495 in the Washington, D.C., metro area. Aument joined Transurban in 2006 and oversaw the 52-mile network of toll roads in the Washington region, including 31 reversible miles on I-95, and was involved with the $2.6 billion Dulles Corridor Metrorail Project.


She previously worked with Bechtel Infrastructure to develop


the Metrorail’s Silver Line and was a Virginia Port Authority commissioner until 2020. A West Virginia University and George Washington University graduate, Aument serves on the board of the Eno Center for Transportation, a Washington, D.C.-based nonpartisan think tank.


186 VIRGINIA 500


ROBERT BOWEN EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, NORFOLK AIRPORT AUTHORITY, NORFOLK


Born into a family of commercial watermen on the Northern Neck, Bowen worked at a fish processing plant while attending Old Dominion University. In his final year at ODU, he spent a summer fueling aircraſt at Norfolk International Airport.


Bowen has spent 44 years at the airport, including 33 with the Norfolk


Airport Authority. During the height of the pandemic, the airport took a mas- sive hit, with ridership declining by 94% at one point. Short-term layoffs and furloughs followed, but by May, passenger activity was at 290,984, 18% behind May 2019’s total, but hiring and pay raises have resumed. In May, Breeze Airways, a new low-cost airline started by the founder of JetBlue, announced it would set up its first East Coast hub at Norfolk International Airport, producing 116 jobs. A $26 million bond issue will refund existing bonds and save nearly $6 million in interest during 10 years. In June, Bowen


announced he will retire on March 1, 2022. The airport authority’s board will con- duct the selection process for his replacement.


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