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RETAIL/WHOLESALE ROBERT S.


‘BOBBY’ UKROP CHAIRMAN AND CEO, UKROP’S HOMESTYLE FOODS LLC, RICHMOND


As a student at Richmond’s George Wythe High


School, Ukrop juggled his studies with a job work- ing as a courtesy clerk at the family-owned Ukrop’s Super Markets. Aſter earning a bachelor’s degree and an MBA


from the University of Richmond and the University of Virginia respectively, Ukrop returned to the family business, where he enjoyed a 40-year career, with more than a decade spent as CEO. He also served on UR’s board for 20 years and chaired ChamberRVA. In 2010, the Giant-Carlisle division of Ahold pur- chased the grocery chain, but Ukrop wasn’t ready for retirement. He launched Ukrop’s Homestyle Foods, which produces ready-to-heat meals, sides, salads and baked goods that are familiar to legions of Richmonders. In December, Ukrop’s Market Hall, a retail space and dining room in Henrico County, opened to immediate success and has about 400 employees.


WHAT MAKES ME PASSIONATE ABOUT MY WORK: The opportunity to help enhance the quality of life for our customers and our associates as together we strive to nourish families and communities with the food we make.


WHAT I WAS LIKE IN HIGH SCHOOL: Very shy, probably because I stuttered


SOMETHING I WOULD NEVER DO AGAIN: Ballroom dancing lessons


DENNIS


WINNETT PLANT MANAGER, THE HERSHEY CO., STUARTS DRAFT


For more than three decades, Winnett has worked in


operations management for the food industry. A graduate of the University of Southern Mississippi, Winnett launched his career working as a frontline supervisor for Quaker Oats in Missouri. Next, he was off to the Chicago area as technical coordinator of puff cereal processing for General Mills. Winnett then worked as a plant manager at International Multifoods in Missouri and later at an Alabama facility owned by Golden Oval Eggs. Making a sweet career move, Winnett joined


the Hershey Co. in 2012 as a plant manager in Robinson, Illinois. Four years later, he moved to Stuarts Draſt to manage Hershey’s second- largest plant in the United States, where employ- ees produce Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups and other products.


During his time with the company, Winnett


has overseen considerable growth. In 2019, the Hershey Co. invested $104 million on an expan- sion and a facility to house the Roasting Center of Excellence. A year later, the company invested an additional $135 million on expansion, adding more than 100 jobs.


In 2019, the company started holding two-week


paid boot camps in Augusta County to train anyone interested in working in food manufacturing.


JACK WOODFIN CEO AND PRESIDENT, WOODFIN HEATING INC.; CEO, EMC MECHANICAL SERVICES, RICHMOND


Woodfin lost his mother, Anne Cunningham Woodfin, in February, when she died aſter battling a decades-long inoperable brain tumor. Together with her late husband, John Howlett Woodfin, she co-founded Woodfin Oil in 1977.


Caring for the company his mother and father built has been Jack Woodfin’s mission for the entirety of his career. Since 2011, he’s led the busi- ness as CEO. He didn’t start off at the top, though, instead working as retail manager from 1995 until 2001, when he became chief operating officer and executive vice president. Additionally, Woodfin has served as CEO of a Richmond commercial mechanical contractor,


EMC, since 2006. Woodfin Co. began as a small heating-oil firm, but it’s grown over the years


to offer a variety of services, including plumbing, electrical and home automation. In 2020, Woodfin Heating Inc. received $10 million from the federal Paycheck Protection Program. As a young man, Woodfin followed in his father’s footsteps and attended VMI, where he played varsity tennis. Aſter graduating with a degree in electrical engineering in 1991, Woodfin went on to earn an MBA from the University of Virginia.


TING XU PRESIDENT, FOUNDER AND CHAIRMAN, EVERGREEN ENTERPRISES; CEO AND CO-OWNER, PLOW & HEARTH, RICHMOND


A native of Shanghai, Xu understands the difficulties of owning a small business.


Although she now runs one of the U.S.’s largest flag wholesalers, Xu launched Evergreen Enterprises from her garage in 1993.


When demand for outdoor heaters by restaurant owners skyrocketed last year because the chances of contracting COVID-19 while outside are lower, Xu wanted to help. Aſter locating 200 much-in-demand outdoor heat lamps, she worked with the city of Richmond to donate them to small-business owners. “We’re fortunate to have the sourc- ing capabilities and factory partners to help us deliver these


178 VIRGINIA 500


MICHAEL A.


WITYNSKI PRESIDENT AND CEO, DOLLAR TREE INC., CHESAPEAKE


With Witynski at the helm, Dollar Tree made more than $25 billion in sales in 2020, an 8% increase over the prior year. Dollar Tree’s board selected


Witynski, who has more than four decades of retail experience, to replace CEO Gary Philbin in July 2020. With supply chains logjammed, raw material costs increasing and inflation on the rise in mid-2021, Witynski said the store would continue to “deliver at a dollar.” More locations are opening in 2021, including some that combine Dollar Tree with Family Dollar, a discount store where prices are not locked in at $1 per item. A Fortune 500 company, the discount retail giant operates under the brands Dollar Tree, Family Dollar and Dollar Tree Canada. It owns more than 15,700 stores and employs more than 200,000. Aſter joining Dollar Tree in 2010 as senior vice president of stores, Witynski quickly climbed the ranks, becoming president in 2017. Earlier in his career, Witynski worked as president of Shaw’s Supermarkets and as executive for Supervalu Inc.


A graduate of Benedictine


University in Illinois, Witynski sits on the boards of the Chrysler Museum of Art and the Virginia Foundation for Independent Colleges.


sought-aſter heaters,” Xu said in a statement. Evergreen Enterprises has come a long way since Xu’s mother designed and sewed flags that the family sold at the Virginia State Fair. With annual revenue of about $250 million and more than 1,000 employees, Evergreen Enterprises sells home and garden decor, giſts and licensed sports items. The company more than doubled the size of its Richmond showroom this year. Over a decade ago, Xu and her husband, Frank Qiu, bought PH International LLC, parent company to a number of brands, including Madison-based Plow & Hearth, which sells home decor and garden products.


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