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GRANT F. REID CEO AND OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT, MARS INC. McLEAN


Reid walks the cocoa fields in Ghana and Brazil, where the plants used in making the chocolate for Mars’ M&Ms candies and Milky Way candy bars are


grown. He wants to ensure quality and to increase environmen- tal sustainability. Reid, who hails from Scotland, is passionate about lifelong learning, and his hobbies include mountain biking, mixed martial arts, historic car racing, and strength and condi- tioning training. He has been with Mars for 31 years and was appointed as CEO in 2014, joining Mars’ board of directors the following year. Reid has led a number of social initiatives during his CEO


tenure. He’s urged other companies to study their environmental impact, pointing out that Mars’ own evaluation revealed that the manufacturer of candy, pet food and other food products had the same carbon footprint as a nation as large as Panama. Reid will oſten point to the mantra that he said guides him and the corporation: “Profit without purpose isn’t meaningful, and purpose without profit isn’t possible.”


VINCE SHEEHY IV PRESIDENT AND CEO, SHEEHY AUTO STORES, FAIRFAX


Sheehy has been at the helm of Sheehy Auto Stores since 1987, transforming a single car dealership into one of the most recognizable names in car sales in Virginia and Maryland.


Sheehy’s father founded the company in the 1960s, and Sheehy worked his way up through various roles. Becoming president in 1998, Sheehy oversaw the


business’s expansion to nearly 30 locations reaching from northern Maryland to Richmond.


Sheehy has helped spearhead apprenticeship programs for high school students in D.C.-region public school systems, and he has been a supporter of Catholic schools, particularly his alma mater, Georgetown Preparatory School. Earlier this year, Sheehy and his brother Paul, the company’s used vehicle


director, donated $100,000 to the Innocence Project at the University of Virginia School of Law aſter listening to a speech by a wrongfully convicted man whom the organization had helped free from prison. (Vince and Paul Sheehy and their sister Ann Fowler, the company’s director of real estate, co-own the family business.)


Sheehy earned his bachelor’s degree from Dickinson College and his MBA from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.


STEVEN C. SMITH PRESIDENT AND CEO, K-VA-T FOOD STORES INC., ABINGDON


Growing up, Smith spent a lot of time in the Grundy Piggly Wiggly store that his dad, grandfather and a couple of other family members opened in 1955. The Smith family went on to purchase numer-


ous grocery stores, including a 19-store chain called Quality Foods, which in 1984 they gave the Food City name. Today, K-VA-T Food Stores, Food City’s parent company, operates 137 retail outlets throughout Southeast Kentucky, Southwest Virginia, East Tennessee and North Georgia. The company opened its first store in Alabama in April. Additionally, K-VA-T owns and operates a 1.1 million-square-foot Food City Distribution Center in Abingdon, the location of the company headquarters.


Over his 42-year career, Smith held numerous jobs ranging from director of meat operations to director of advertising and chief operating officer before replacing his father, Jack C. Smith, as CEO in 2001. K-VA-T has about 17,500 employees and earned $2.95 billion in revenue in 2020.


FIRST JOB: Cemetery worker. I trimmed, mowed and dug graves.


SOMETHING I WOULD NEVER DO AGAIN: Go through a pandemic.


ONE THING I WOULD CHANGE ABOUT VIRGINIA: I’d like to see more development [in] and commitment to the rural areas of Virginia.


SHANE SMITH PRESIDENT AND CEO, SMITHFIELD FOODS INC., SMITHFIELD


Smithfield Foods appointed Smith CEO in July, shortly aſter his predecessor, Dennis Organ, unexpectedly stepped down aſter less than a year, capping a


tumultuous period for the world’s largest pork product manufac- turer and hog producer.


Organ had been at the helm for about seven months when he resigned for personal reasons. Smith stepped in as CEO just days aſter the company announced it would no longer be slaughtering pigs in the company’s hometown of Smithfield. The company, a wholly owned subsidiary of China-based WH Group, announced several executive retirements earlier this year, as the meat industry giant continued dealing with the pandemic, which had disrupted operations amid factory outbreaks in 2020, some resulting in worker deaths.


Smith joined Smithfield in 2003 as a financial analyst.


He held various executive leadership roles with Smithfield overseas before returning to Virginia as the company’s chief strategic officer.


Smith holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting from the University of Mount Olive and an MBA from William & Mary.


CHARLES E. TYSON PRESIDENT AND CEO, LL FLOORING, RICHMOND


Tyson stepped up as interim president and principal executive officer at the Henrico County- based retailer of hard-surface flooring aſter Dennis Knowles resigned abruptly as president, CEO and board member in February 2020.


At that time, Tyson had been at the company for less than two years as chief customer experience officer. In that role, he was responsible for the company’s merchandising and marketing, consumer and pro sales, installa- tion and distribution. Last May, members of the board announced Tyson had received the top job permanently, a month aſter the company rebranded from Lumber Liquidators to LL Flooring. Previously, Tyson worked at Advance Auto Parts Inc. for nine years, most recently as executive vice president for merchandising, marketing and supply chain. Before that, he held senior roles at Office Max and Office Depot.


In 2020, LL Holdings reported $1.1 billion in net sales, a $5.1 million


increase over 2019. In 2020, the company opened six stores while closing 15 others, including all Canadian locations. The company now operates 416 stores nationwide. A graduate of Guildhall University in London, Tyson volunteered as a fundraiser for JDRF International, which funds research into Type 1 diabetes.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 177


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