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RETAIL/WHOLESALE


DAVID GUM CEO, WHITE HOUSE FOODS, WINCHESTER


The patriarch of the Gum family and head of the century-old White House Foods, Gum is a country boy at heart. A lifelong resident


of the region, he lives on a farm in Frederick County. His family’s empire has expanded from apples to include handcraſted furniture.


Gum has been with White House Foods since 1981, and in 2006 the Gum family bought the fruit company. Today it is the largest privately held apple-processing company in the country, producing more than 650 varieties of juice, applesauce and vinegar. Gum’s entrepreneurial interests aren’t limited to apples. His family firm focuses on purchasing companies in distress, and in 2013, it bought furniture craſters Henkel Harris in Winchester. Gum has instituted profit-sharing systems at both White House Foods and Henkel Harris, giving all employees a stake in each company’s success. He also serves on several community boards, including stints with the Virginia Manufacturers Association, the Apple Processors Association and the USO of Metropolitan Washington-Baltimore.


GEORGE L. HOLM CHAIRMAN, PRESIDENT AND CEO, PERFORMANCE FOOD GROUP, GOOCHLAND


Holm has been in the food- distribution industry for more than 40 years, holding leadership positions with major distribu-


tors, including Alliant Foodservice, US Food and Sysco Corp. In 2002, Holm founded Vistar, a multichannel food, snack and beverage distributor that rapidly grew into a multibillion-dollar enterprise. Holm has been president and CEO of Performance


Food Group since May 2008, when Vistar acquired it, and in 2019, he took the business public, becoming its chairman. The company, with headquarters in Goochland County, has a nationwide network of more than 100 distribution centers. In May, Performance Food Group announced the acquisition of convenience store supplier Core-Mark for $2.5 billion in stock and cash, and the purchase is expected to add about $17 billion to the company’s net annual sales, while expanding its reach into the entire country and parts of Canada. Holm has spearheaded efforts to diversify PFG’s business sectors beyond just restaurant supplies, and the need for new avenues intensified as COVID-19 shut down restaurant dining for months.


MARC KATZ CHAIRMAN AND CEO, CUSTOM INK, FAIRFAX


Katz was sleeping on an air mattress in a basement when he and a couple of college friends launched Custom Ink, a design-it-yourself online T-shirt retailer in 2000. It was the peak of the dot-com boom, and Katz had just quit his job on Wall Street because he wanted to do something more entrepreneurial.


Today, the company employs more than 1,600 people, and Katz has earned his original supporters their original investment back many times over. The company saw its sales plummet at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.


With social distancing making social gatherings impossible, Custom Ink’s sales fell by 80% in just two weeks, and Katz had to institute mass furloughs. The company survived by harnessing the new trends caused by the pandemic, selling masks, work- from-home gear and virtual high school graduation swag. Katz grew up around entrepreneurs — his father, Steve Katz, started three busi- nesses and had plenty of advice as Katz started Custom Ink, a business that his father thought had no shot of surviving. Earning his bachelor’s degree in physics, Katz graduated from Harvard


University, where he also led community service programs through the Phillips Brooks House Association.


MARTIN KELLY CONDUCTOR OF CREATIVITY, CULTURE & COMMERCE, SAUER BRANDS INC., RICHMOND


Kelly has held numerous leadership positions within the food and beverage industry, oſten stepping in to execute major business realignments or new strategies. He was a vice president at Coca-Cola and Miller Brewing Co. before taking on executive positions in the booming craſt beer industry in the early 2000s. As the president and CEO of Magic Hat Brewing Co. from 2004 to 2010, he increased revenues tenfold before getting into the frozen food industry, hoping to similarly jump-start growth. Kelly has led Richmond-based Sauer Brands since 2019, aſter the former C.F. Sauer Co. was purchased by Charlotte, North Carolina-based private equity firm Falfurrias Capital Group. In 2020, Kelly announced that the company would begin sponsoring an annual college football bowl game, and the Duke’s Mayo Bowl was born. That same year, Sauer also acquired Kernel Season’s, the top popcorn seasoning brand in the country, and its parent company, Chicago Custom Foods. Kelly attended the University of Virginia, where he earned degrees from the McIntire School of Commerce and the Darden School of Business.


174 VIRGINIA 500


TRAVIS HILL CEO, VIRGINIA ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL AUTHORITY, RICHMOND


Hill, who took the reins of Virginia ABC in 2018, grew up in a family where political debate was welcomed. He remembers his grandfather encouraging


everyone to chime in, even the kids, when discus- sions got heated at the dinner table. And that ability to take in multiple perspectives has served Hill well while navigating the halls and politics of Richmond. He joined the ABC in 2014, when he was appointed as chief operating officer, and he’s over- seeing the agency’s move to a new headquarters and distribution center in Hanover County, which opened in June. In fiscal year 2020, Virginia ABC brought in a record $1.2 billion in gross revenue, including $212.1 million in profits from retail sales. Previously, Hill served as deputy secretary of agricul- ture and forestry for both Gov. Bob McDonnell and Gov. Terry McAuliffe. He also worked as an attor- ney with Williams Mullen from 2003 to 2011. Hill earned his bachelor’s and law degrees


from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and when he’s not working, he enjoys biking, paddleboarding on the James River and Saturday-night family dinners.


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