search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
GARY


BOWMAN PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER, PRESIDENT AND CEO, BOWMAN CONSULTING GROUP LTD., RESTON


Trained as a civil engineer at Virginia Tech, Bowman founded his Reston-based engineering services firm in 1995, and today it employs 750-plus people in more than 30 offices across the United States. Before starting his company, Bowman was a principal for 15 years at Urban Engineering.


This has been a big year for Bowman Consulting, which went public in May, raising $51.73 million by selling 3.69 million shares at $14 a share. In January, the company announced it had acquired Herndon-based engineering firm KTA Group Inc., which pro- vides engineering, mechanical, electrical and plumbing services. Bowman Consulting has a wide array of projects on its plate, including working on data centers and Dominion Energy Inc.’s substation security system, designing more than 20 Walgreens stores and developing the Dulles International Park in Sterling. In the first quarter of 2021, the company generated just under $32 million in gross revenue. “Adding KTA’s comprehensive skill sets and experience greatly enhances our ability to serve as a one-stop provider of design services to our clients,” Bowman said. Bowman serves on the advisory board of Virginia Tech’s College of Engineering.


BOB CLARK PROFESSIONAL


ENGINEER, PRESIDENT, BASKERVILL, RICHMOND


Aſter working more than 25 years at Richmond-based engineering, architec-


ture and interior design firm Baskervill, Clark still enjoys what he does. “We’re designing spaces where great work and great discovery is happening,” he says. “It’s powerful.” The Virginia Military Institute alumnus came to Baskervill as a mechanical engineer in 1995 aſter five years serving as an engineering officer for the U.S. Air Force. He became com- pany president in 2004.


Early in the pandemic, Baskervill laid off 25 employees and later furloughed others, but now the firm is back up to 100 employees across the United States and Poland.


WHAT A COMPETITOR WOULD SAY ABOUT MY FIRM: I hope they’d say the same about us as we would about them: that we celebrate great design, no matter its origin.


HOBBY/PASSION: I really enjoy snowboarding with my kids. In the early years, I would slow down so they could keep up, but now that they’re in their late teens, the dynamics have changed. The tables have turned!


C. TORREY BREEDEN EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, THE BREEDEN CO. INC., VIRGINIA BEACH


Breeden, whose name is well-known across the Hampton Roads region and beyond, focuses on land acquisition and development of new communities across the Southeast U.S. for the multi- family, single-family and commercial construction company founded 60 years ago by his father, Ramon W. Breeden Jr.


The Breeden Co., which has 400 employees and reported about $355 million in 2020 revenue, has a portfolio encompassing more than 15,000 apartments and 2 million square feet of retail and office space. Torrey Breeden started at the company in 1997 aſter earning his bachelor’s degree from


the University of Virginia. He enjoys traveling and pilots the company’s corporate jets and several helicopters. Over the summer, the company broke ground on a $2.4 million expan- sion to its headquarters on Lynnhaven Parkway.


FIRST JOB: I was a Cutco knife salesperson. I did not sell door to door, but it was close.


WHAT I WAS LIKE IN HIGH SCHOOL: I was athletic. I played football and baseball.


HOBBY/PASSION: Ballroom dancing. It is beautiful to watch; it is beautiful to participate.


GEORGE B. CLARKE IV PRESIDENT, MEB, CHESAPEAKE


While earning his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Virginia Tech, Clarke worked for his father’s construc- tion company, Kenbridge Construction Co. Shortly aſter graduation, Clarke launched MEB in 1982. Today, he leads about 230 employees, with all but a handful working in Virginia. The company, which earned $216 million in 2020 revenue, shortened its name from MEB General Contractors to MEB last year aſter an 18-month


rebranding process, and it also has refreshed and expanded its headquarters in Chesapeake. MEB is the construction manager for a $112 million project designed to protect the historic


Norfolk Grandy Village and Chesterfield Heights neighborhoods from flooding. The project involves building concrete retaining walls, raised roadways and two pump stations for storm- water removal, as well as making stormwater and utility improvements.


PERSON I ADMIRE: John R. Lawson II, executive chairman of W.M. Jordan Co. — a great friend and a great businessman.


FAVORITE SPORTS TEAM: Any Virginia Tech team.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 159


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196