search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
PROFESSIONAL SER VICES


ERIC SCHEINERMAN PRESIDENT AND CEO, CIBT INC., McLEAN


Scheinerman first joined CIBT in 2019 as its chief financial officer, aſter serving as Wind River Environmental’s CFO. He’s held senior finance roles at several companies, includ- ing Irish auto parts company Aptiv plc. CIBT provides immigration and visa services to help businesses and individuals navigate regulations all over the globe. The firm reports that it is the primary provider of this service to 75% of Fortune 500 companies. Scheinerman has experience leading multinational complex organizations,


having served in Shanghai as vice president of finance for Aptiv’s $9 billion Electrical/Electronic Architecture Segment, which had operations in 28 countries and more than 120,000 employees. He has his work cut out for him at CIBT. As borders have been shut down due to the pandemic, CIBT faced major challenges over the past 18 months, and last October, Moody’s Investors Service Inc. downgraded the firm’s corporate family rat- ing. With much of CIBT’s business dependent on international travel, the company began cost-cutting measures in 2020 to offset the decrease in revenue. CIBT’s corporate headquarters is in McLean, and Scheinerman works out of the firm’s global headquarters in Washington, D.C.


KEVIN SMITHSON D.C. METRO OFFICE LEADER, PRICEWATERHOUSE COOPERS LLC, McLEAN


As of July 1, Smithson is the point person for the more than 2,000 PricewaterhouseCoopers employees in Washington, D.C., and Northern Virginia. Last year, Smithson was named as the Big Four firm’s mid-Atlantic


managing partner, a position that put him in charge of more than 4,000 employees in six offices across the Eastern Seaboard, but a company restructuring this year did away with the regional management positions. He also has served as PwC’s east region tax leader.


Smithson has more than 25 years of consulting experience, with a focus on cor- porate tax, serving clients in industries ranging from real estate to pharmaceuticals. Smithson has written extensively about business strategies for reopening. In


April, as vaccine availability was on the upswing, he wrote an opinion piece for The Hill, calling for greater transparency around return-to-work plans and for employ- ers to balance safety with privacy. He received his bachelor’s degree in accounting from American University and when he lived in Boston, he served on boards for the local YMCA and charities focusing on suicide prevention and advancing women business leaders.


CHRIS STUART VICE PRESIDENT, TOP GUARD SECURITY, NORFOLK


Stuart, vice president and co-founder of Top Guard Security, has helped grow his family’s private security firm into the largest in Hampton Roads. The former Hampton city councilman over- sees an organization that employs more than 1,000 armed and unarmed guards dispatched to clients throughout the commonwealth. His wife, Nicole Stuart, is president of the company that the pair founded in 1996. 2020 was a tumultuous year for Top Guard, largely due to the firm losing a highly publi- cized $2.5 million annual security contract with the city of Norfolk that it first won in 2004. Still, Stuart is optimistic. He said he loves “besting competitors that are billion-dollar firms but cannot translate that into the quality of service and attentiveness clients expect.”


HOBBY/PASSION: Chasing five children around; 5 a.m. weightlifting.


WHAT I WAS LIKE IN HIGH SCHOOL: Skinny, insecure and an average student.


WHAT A COMPETITOR WOULD SAY ABOUT ME: Chris and Nicole Stuart run a good company and are fierce but honest competitors.


PAUL THOMPSON MANAGING PARTNER VIRGINIA MARKET, DIXON HUGHES GOODMAN LLP, RICHMOND


Thompson oversees DHG’s operations in Virginia and West Virginia, managing offices in Chesterfield, Norfolk, Richmond and Charleston, West Virginia. He has worked closely with companies experiencing rapid growth, and his disciplines include mergers, acquisitions, strategic planning, accounting systems and transaction support services. Thompson has been with DHG since 2014. Prior to that, he was a partner with McGladrey (now RSM US LLP). Thompson earned his bachelor’s degree in accounting from Frostburg State University. With headquarters in Charlotte, North Carolina, DHG provides assurance, tax and advisory services for clients throughout the United States and internationally. DHG’s original iteration was M. Lu Goodman, founded in Norfolk in 1932. Since then, the firm has grown into the largest accounting firm headquartered in the Southeast, employing more than 2,000 people in 13 states.


154 VIRGINIA 500


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196