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PROFESSIONAL SER VICES


RAND BLAZER PRESIDENT, APEX SYSTEMS LLC, FAIRFAX COUNTY


Blazer has been with Apex Systems since 2007, aſter nearly 30 years with KPMG US LLC. The former U.S. Army captain has helped Apex, based in Glen Allen, grow into a


firm with roughly 2,640 employees across the state. Apex and its parent company, ASGN Inc., together form one of the nation’s largest IT staffing and services firms. Apex alone generated revenues of $630 million during the first quarter of 2021, accounting for 62% of ASGN’s revenue. Virginia successfully lured ASGN from California in 2020, when the firm announced it was moving its headquarters to Henrico County and would be creating roughly 700 jobs in the commonwealth. “The best advice I could give is to commit to being a business adviser to your client,” Blazer says. “Creating business dialogue and knowing what is important to our clients makes us better and able to provide real value to their business.” In his free time, Blazer volunteers


with the Montgomery Youth Hockey Association, promoting the sport for disadvantaged youth in Montgomery County, Maryland. He also has worked with the Greater Washington Partnership, which examines employment trends in the Washington region.


JACOB BLONDIN PRESIDENT AND CEO, RETAILDATA LLC, RICHMOND


Blondin joined RetailData in 2015 as vice president of strategic initiatives, and in 2020 he was promoted to president and CEO, following the retirement of Christopher Ferguson. As retailers have transitioned from brick- and-mortar locations to e-commerce operations, RetailData has evolved to provide analysis on digital pricing and promotion strategies. In a statement last year, Blondin said the


COVID-19 pandemic dramatically accelerated that transition, and in an era when consumers can comparison shop at the click of a button, the Richmond-based pricing retail intelligence firm helps clients understand the differences in metrics between in-store and online offerings. Prior to joining RetailData, Blondin spent more than a decade working in leadership roles within a variety of industries, including con- struction services and bioenergy. He earned his bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering at Northeastern University and received an MBA from Arizona State University.


KRISTEN CAVALLO CEO, THE MARTIN AGENCY, RICHMOND


Richmond’s iconic advertising agency has continued to rack up awards, clients and revenue under the leadership of CEO Cavallo.


She returned to Martin in 2017 as its first female CEO; Cavallo spent 13 years at the agency before leaving to become president of MullenLowe U.S. in 2011. Prior to her hiring, Martin was dealing with bad press as sexual harassment allegations against the agency’s former chief creative officer came to light. Under Cavallo, the agency has ushered in a phase of growth and greater diversity among Martin’s leadership.


Cavallo kicked off 2020 with the announcement that the firm had just landed Old Navy as a client. The rest of the year, of course, would be spent dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic as travel restrictions and limits on group gather- ings made it all but impossible to continue production of live ads.


The firm shiſted strategies and focused more heavily on motion graphics and animation, and Cavallo said last year that most layoffs were offset by hiring in these areas. Later in the year, Martin was named Adweek’s 2020 U.S. Agency of the Year aſter reporting 30% net growth in new and organic revenue. It was the only U.S. finalist to report double-digit growth.


150 VIRGINIA 500


Kristen Cavallo photo courtesy The Martin Agency


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