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TIM ROSE CEO, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA FOUNDATION, CHARLOTTESVILLE


The longtime leader of U.Va.’s foundation, Rose works with his team to provide financial services and solutions to benefit Mr. Jefferson’s University and 23 university-related foundations and organizations. In the role, he also oversees a broad range of real estate services sup- porting the university, serving as steward for about 5,200 acres of university properties, including the Boar’s Head Resort and its Birdwood Golf Course in Charlottesville, as well as the campus’s fraternity and sorority housing. In March, the U.Va. board of visitors’ building and grounds committee approved a proposal for a 215-room, $130.5 million hotel and conference center at the corner of Emmet Street and Ivy Road. The hotel’s design team includes architects Deborah Berke Partners of New York and Norfolk- based Hanbury.


JENNIFER MORRIS CEO, THE NATURE CONSERVANCY, ARLINGTON


Aſter spending a quarter of a century working to protect the environment, Morris became The Nature Conservancy’s CEO in May 2020. Due to the pandemic, Morris, who lives in Washington, D.C., met her new colleagues and volunteers mostly over Zoom. COVID-19 lockdowns also meant Morris and her team couldn’t travel to Brazil to coach planters working on a reforestation project developed by The Nature Conservancy in part- nership with local government there. Instead, they sent the farmers how-to videos over a social messaging app. Things have changed quite a bit since Morris launched her career 30 years ago teaching English in a small village in Namibia. She holds a master’s degree in international affairs from Columbia


University, and prior to helming The Nature Conservancy, Morris was pres- ident of Arlington-based nonprofit Conservation International, where she worked for more than two decades. In that post, she oversaw programs across 29 countries, impacting more than 1 billon acres of protected land.


Earlier in his career, Rose served as an assis- tant vice president for administration at U.Va. He also held positions in student affairs for Miami University in Ohio and James Madison University. Aſter receiving his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Miami University, Rose earned his doctorate from U.Va.


TRAVIS


STATON PRESIDENT AND CEO, UNITED WAY OF SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, ABINGDON


LAWRENCE A. ‘LARRY’ SELZER PRESIDENT AND CEO, THE CONSERVATION FUND, ARLINGTON


For two decades, Selzer has led the Conservation Fund, an envi- ronmental nonprofit that aims to restore nature while creating economic and recreational opportunities. Founded in 1985, the fund has protected more than 8 million acres across America. Selzer enjoyed a big win in June, when an Alaska native village


corporation agreed to sell 44,000 acres of land as permanent conservation easements to the Conservation Fund for $18.3 million. The easements will cover a portion of what would have been the northern transportation route for the proposed Pebble Mine in Southwest Alaska, a wrinkle that may prove to be an obstacle to the controversial mining project. As a kid growing up in Connecticut, Selzer enjoyed watching Mutual of Omaha’s


“Wild Kingdom” TV show. He earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies at Wesleyan University, going on to conduct research on marine mammals and seabird populations. Later, Selzer received his MBA from the University of Virginia. Today, he sits on the boards for the Weyerhaeuser Co., a timberland business, and the American Bird Conservancy.


Since 2005, Staton has led the United Way of Southwest Virginia, which works to create solu- tions for improving the region’s health, education and financial stability. During Staton’s tenure, he’s guided the organization through eight different mergers and acquisitions, and he now oversees operations across 17 counties and four cities — nearly 20% of the state. In 2018, Charity Navigator named the United Way of Southwest Virginia one of the 10 best United Way chapters out of more than 1,200 nationwide. In November 2020, the United Way of Southwest Virginia made headlines for a report it commissioned that found that half of Southwest Virginia households earned less than basic living costs in 2018 — and that was before the economic crisis caused by the pandemic. “Even though the cost of living in the region is lower than in the rest of the state, it is higher than what most residents earn,” Staton said. In 2018, Gov. Ralph Northam appointed Staton


to the Virginia Board of Workforce Development. Staton has a bachelor’s degree in business admin- istration from East Tennessee State University.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 147


Jennifer Morris photo by Katie Bryden/Conservation International


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