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NONPROFITS/PHILANTHROP Y


KEVIN A. LYNCH PRESIDENT AND CEO, NATIONAL INDUSTRIES FOR THE BLIND, ALEXANDRIA


Lynch has worked for the National Industries for the Blind (NIB) or its associated agencies for 40 years, acting as the organization’s head since 2008. Founded in 1938, the organization and its network of associated nonprofits make up the nation’s largest employer of people who are blind. Under Lynch’s leadership, NIB recently launched NSITE, a resource connecting employers seeking to broaden their talent pool with qualified job seekers who are blind, visually impaired and/or veterans.


The Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation donated $95,700 in March to fund an NSITE Cisco Academy training program. The first such program adapted for the learning styles of people who are blind, it will prepare students for jobs in cybersecurity. Before joining NIB, Lynch worked as executive director of Georgia Industries for the Blind, where he managed three manufacturing plants that employed 165 people who are blind. Prior to that, he was director of manufacturing for the Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired of Greater Rochester, New York, where he negotiated contracts with commercial customers including Eastman Kodak Co. and Xerox Corp.


ELIZABETH A. DR. WILLIAM P.


MAGEE JR. CO-FOUNDER AND CEO, OPERATION SMILE INC., VIRGINIA BEACH


A plastic and craniofacial surgeon, Magee founded Operation Smile in 1982 with his wife, Kathy, a former nurse and clinical social worker. The international medical charity has provided free surgical and den- tal care to more than 300,000 people. The nonprofit’s financial supporters include PepsiCo Inc.’s potato chip brand Lay’s, which featured Kathy Magee on select bags as part of a campaign to support Operation Smile.


The organization was born when the


couple traveled to the Philippines as medi- cal volunteers to repair children’s cleſt lips and palates. About 300 families showed up seeking care for their children, but volun- teers could treat only 40. Before leaving, the Magees promised to return. One of 12 children, Magee earned his medical degree from George Washington University and his dental surgery degree from the University of Maryland. He leſt his plastic surgery practice in 2016 to dedicate all his energy to Operation Smile.


FAVORITE SONG: “The Eagle and the Hawk,” by John Denver


SISTER DONNA MARKHAM PRESIDENT, CATHOLIC CHARITIES USA, ALEXANDRIA


The first woman to lead Catholic Charities USA in its 110-year history, Markham oversees 167 member agencies serving 13 million people each year. It is the largest private network of social service organizations in the United States. An Adrian Dominican sister, Markham fre- quently speaks out for the oppressed, advocating for policies to eliminate systemic racism and to protect Americans on the brink of homelessness. In April 2021, Markham, who is in her sixth year leading Catholic Charities, wrote a letter to a U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee on border security, facilitation and operations, encouraging lawmakers to enact more humane immigration policies. “Hearing of the root causes that compel families to make the difficult decision of sending their children to our country in the hope that they may reunite with family members simply to survive should cause all Americans to pause and contemplate such a decision,” she wrote. A clinical psychologist, Markham led a behavioral health institute in Ohio and served as prioress general of the Adrian Dominican Congregation. Her name was a clue on the TV show “Jeopardy!” in 2017.


McCLANAHAN CEO, VIRGINIA TECH FOUNDATION, BLACKSBURG


A former Supreme Court of Virginia justice, McClanahan became the Virginia Tech Foundation’s CEO on June 1. The foundation manages the university’s $1.3 billion endowment. Before taking the job, she served as president and dean of the Appalachian School of Law. There, McClanahan established a partnership among the school, Virginia Tech’s Pamplin College of Business and Ballad Health for a project combining health and legal services at a single point of care. Aſter earning her bachelor’s degree


from William & Mary and her law degree from the University of Dayton School of Law, McClanahan launched her career as an Abingdon attorney. She later served as chief deputy in the state attorney general’s office. Lawmakers appointed


McClanahan to the Virginia Court of Appeals in 2003. In 2011, they tapped her for the Supreme Court of Virginia, where she stayed until 2019.


NEW LIFE EXPERIENCE: Zip-lining at 45 mph at 6,500-foot altitude in Colorado


FAVORITE BEVERAGE: S.Pellegrino sparkling mineral water


WHAT MAKES ME PASSIONATE ABOUT MY WORK: Providing opportunities for students to learn, grow, innovate, create, invent — to achieve their goals and dreams and improve the human condition


NEERAJ MEHTA


INTERIM PRESIDENT AND CEO, UNITED WAY WORLDWIDE, ALEXANDRIA


United Way Worldwide tapped Mehta as its interim president and CEO on March 1, following the departure of longtime leader Brian Gallagher. Mehta has been associated with United Way as a


donor, advocate and volunteer for the past 20 years. He was previously chair of the United Way’s USA board of trustees and a member of its Worldwide board of trustees. Gallagher abruptly resigned in March, amid a third- party law firm’s examination into how United Way leadership had investigated internal claims of sexual harassment and discrimination. The firm found that


146 VIRGINIA 500


United Way Worldwide had not engaged in “actionable harassment, discrimination or retaliation” and had observed “appropriate processes and procedures,” though it recom- mended that the organization review those procedures. The world’s largest privately funded nonprofit, United


Way works to improve education, strengthen individual financial stability and build healthier communities. Mehta formerly served as Synchrony Financial’s chief commercial officer and executive vice president and CEO, payment solutions. He is also the former president and CEO, commercial distribution finance, for GE Capital.


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