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DEBORAH M. DiCROCE PRESIDENT AND CEO, HAMPTON ROADS COMMUNITY FOUNDATION, NORFOLK


Over the last year, the Hampton Roads Community Foundation has been funneling its energy toward projects supporting COVID-19 recovery or battling racial injustice.


Under DiCroce’s leadership, the foundation has awarded more than $1.25 million in COVID-19 response grants. This spring, the organization also partnered with the Eastern Virginia Medical School’s M. Foscue Brock Institute for Community and Global Health to host a virtual forum about the pandemic’s impact on mental health. In 2019, the foundation’s board adopted a racial equity statement stating that “advancing a more equitable and inclusive community” is key to its mission. In April 2021, DiCroce posted a statement in response to a jury finding former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin guilty in the May 2020 murder of George Floyd. “Let us not forget what we saw, what we heard, and what we felt,” she wrote. And in June, the foundation announced plans to award $1 million in grants to 30 local Black nonprofits.


Before joining the foundation in 2013, DiCroce served for 14 years as president of Tidewater Community College and for nine years as president of Piedmont Virginia Community College.


TED HART PRESIDENT AND CEO, CHARITIES AID FOUNDATION OF AMERICA (CAF AMERICA), ALEXANDRIA


In his ninth year as CEO of CAF America, Hart can talk a blue streak about regulatory compliance.


A week aſter India changed


its laws governing foreign donations last September, Hart dedicated 30 minutes to the topic on “Caring and Funding: The CAF America Podcast.” While it might not be the most rousing subject matter, failing to understand a country’s regulatory framework can have consequences. When India faced a major COVID-19 outbreak this spring, the law change kept some Indian nonprofits from accepting donations from international organizations. In addition to touting its vetting protocol for global charities, CAF America can assure donors their giſts are tax-deductible, which is not the case when individuals give directly to foreign charities. In addition to his work leading CAF, Hart has written and co-written several books about fundraising and nonprofits.


FAVORITE SONG: “Shining Light,” by Annie Lennox


FAVORITE BEVERAGE: Scotch whisky from Islay


WHAT I'VE LEARNED: To believe in the power of a well-motivated team


ANNE LYNAM GODDARD PRESIDENT AND CEO, CHILDFUND INTERNATIONAL, RICHMOND


Aſter 15 years leading the 83-year-old global child development organi- zation, Goddard plans to retire in May. Raised by an Irish family that immigrated to the United States when she was a young girl, Goddard joined the Peace Corps in 1979. That took her to Kenya, where she lived in a house made of mud and traveled by motorbike. “I never imagined myself as a CEO,” she said in June. “I just wanted to make a difference in the world.” Upon returning to the United States, Goddard earned a master’s degree in public health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She then spent two decades working overseas for humani- tarian agencies in developing countries before joining ChildFund. Last year, ChildFund helped 13.6 million children and family mem- bers in 24 countries, improving their access to health care, nutrition and education.


Announcing her retirement, Goddard does not seem headed for a golf course. “I am excited to explore new avenues where I might continue contributing to helping children and communities thrive,” she said.


LT. GEN. JAMES B. LASTER


(USMC, RET.) PRESIDENT AND CEO, MARINE TOYS FOR TOTS FOUNDATION, QUANTICO


Since taking leadership of the Marine Toys for Tots Foundation in January 2020, Laster saw the nonprofit collect and distribute 20.2 million toys to more than 7 million children last year. This April, Toys for Tots announced plans to


I never imagined myself as a CEO. I just wanted to make a difference in the world.” ANNE LYNAM GODDARD


partner for the second year with Alexandria-based logistics nonprofit Good360, committing to provide a million toys for Good360 to dis- tribute to children. In 2020, the nonprofits distributed 2 million toys, books and games to families in need due to the pandemic — Toys for Tots’ first major initiative outside the Christmas season. “We realize the importance of reminding children that there is still joy to be found in simple giſts every day, no matter how difficult things may be right now,” Laster said in a statement. Laster retired from the U.S. Marine Corps in January 2018, aſter serving for 38 years. From 2011 to 2012, he served in Afghanistan as the deputy chief of staff for joint operations. In 2012, he became chief of staff of the U.S. Special Operations Command. Laster earned a master’s degree in national strategy from the


National War College. In 1989, he received the Marine Corps’ Leſtwich Trophy recognizing outstanding leadership.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 145


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