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TIMOTHY J. O’SHAUGHNESSY PRESIDENT AND CEO, GRAHAM HOLDINGS CO., ARLINGTON


Formerly known as The Washington Post Co., Graham Holdings Co. was created in 2013 aſter the newspaper’s sale to Amazon.com Inc. founder Jeff Bezos for $250 million. Although he does not bear the Graham name, O’Shaughnessy is part of the storied publishing family as son-in-law of Chairman Donald E. Graham. O’Shaughnessy came to Graham Holdings in 2015 aſter serving as CEO of LivingSocial, the online market- place he co-founded in 2007 (now owned by Groupon).


In June, Graham Holdings acquired the Santa Monica, Calif.-based Leaf Group Ltd., a consumer internet company that reaches audiences in lifestyle categories via brands such as Well + Good, Livestrong.com and Saatchi Art. The cash acquisition, valued at $323 million, came aſter Graham Holdings reported first-quarter revenue of $712.5 million, down 3% from 2020’s first quarter. The Georgetown University graduate, who also serves as an executive committee


member of the Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit Federal City Council, is pursuing greater diversification of the company’s assets, which include Slate.com and the education company Kaplan Inc. New avenues include purchases in the hospitality, automotive and lifestyle sectors.


GORDON P.


MIKE REED CEO, GANNETT CO. INC., McLEAN


It’s been an eventful year so far for McLean- based media company Gannett, the nation’s largest newspaper publisher, since it was acquired for $1.1 billion in 2019 by GateHouse Media, the company Reed has headed since 2006. In June, Gannett’s The Indianapolis


ROBERTSON PRESIDENT AND CEO, CHRISTIAN BROADCASTING NETWORK; PRESIDENT, OPERATION BLESSING, VIRGINIA BEACH


A graduate of the Washington and Lee University School of Law, the Yale-educated Robertson answered an evangelical calling while on a mission to India, and aſter a decade of practic- ing law, he moved to the Philippines in 1994.


The son of TV evangelist Pat


Robertson, who at age 91 still appears regularly on the Christian Broadcasting Network’s “The 700 Club,” Gordon Robertson spent his early adulthood founding a missionary training center, Operation Blessing Philippines, as well as an Asian outpost of CBN, the Virginia Beach-based


religious programming television network his father founded in 1960. In 1999, the younger Robertson returned to the United States, and he became head of the network in 2007. CBN’s content now includes “700 Club Interactive,” topical faith-based shows and fran- chises such as “Next Gen Voices” and the animated series “Superbook.” Gordon Robertson also co-hosts “The 700 Club” with his father, and he’s a member of the network’s board of directors.


Star won a 2021 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting. The company also made Forbes magazine’s list of Best Employers for Diversity this year and auctioned off for charity a non-fungible token image of the front page of a Florida Today edition specially made for astronauts on the 1971 Apollo 14 lunar mis- sion led by Cmdr. Alan Shepard. Financially, Gannett has had ups and downs. In announcing the company’s first-quarter results, Reed reported that new digital-only subscriptions surpassed 1.2 million — a $23.2 million boost in the company’s digital-forward strategy. But print advertising was down 24.9%, and digital advertising and marketing service revenues were off 10.4%. However, in August, Gannett reported its first quarterly profit since its merger with GateHouse, with net income of $15 million in the second quarter of 2021. Reed has served on the boards of the


Newspaper Association of America and The Associated Press, as well as the advisory board at Grady College of Journalism & Mass Communication and the University of Alabama’s College of Communication and Information Sciences board of visitors.


CHARLIE WATKINS PRESIDENT AND CEO, LANDMARK MEDIA ENTERPRISES AND DOMINION ENTERPRISES, NORFOLK


Watkins, who joined Landmark more than two decades ago, was named president and CEO of both Dominion Enterprises and Landmark Media Enterprises in 2018. He oversees strategy and performance for Dominion, a media and information services firm specializing in newspaper publishing, Internet publishing and soſtware. It was started by the former Landmark Communications Inc., which owned The Virginian-Pilot and Daily Press newspapers, among other publications. Still controlled by the Batten family, Landmark has sold off


several properties in recent years. In 2019 global investment manage- ment firm AMP Capital purchased Expedient from LME. In May, Paxton Media Group finalized a deal to purchase Landmark Community Newspapers LLC, a chain of daily and weekly newspapers


based in Shelbyville, Kentucky. In April, CoStar Group Inc. announced it had reached an agreement to purchase Homes.com, a division of Dominion Enterprises, for $156 million. Watkins was president of a Duke Energy subsidiary before joining Landmark in 2000. He founded Expedient, a cloud-computing business owned by LME, and served as its CEO while simultaneously working as Landmark’s vice president of corporate development and new ventures.


Before entering private industry, Watkins served in the U.S. Navy as a nuclear-trained officer. He’s a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and William & Mary’s business school.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 141


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