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MEDIA


PAULA A. KERGER PRESIDENT AND CEO, PBS, ARLINGTON


DOUG DAVIS SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT AND REGIONAL MANAGER, NEXSTAR MEDIA INC., PORTSMOUTH


Davis is the point person in Virginia for the country’s largest broadcast television group. Based in Portsmouth, home to WAVY and WVBT’s studios, the New Jersey native came up through the sales and management side of the business, serving in account executive, sales manager and station man- ager roles in Hampton Roads for more than 15 years before being named president and general manager of Norfolk’s ABC and Fox affiliates in 2005. Davis became senior vice president and regional manager in January 2017, and now his responsibilities include stations in North Carolina, Ohio, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island. With 199 stations in 116 markets and $4.5 billion


in 2020 revenue, Nexstar’s parent company, Nexstar Media Group, has a big reach. It employs more than 300 people in Virginia at stations in Norfolk, Richmond, Roanoke and Bristol. A Duke University alumnus, Davis served as president of the Virginia Association of Broadcasters and was a board member of the Fox Affiliate Board of Governors. He is also a member of the development advisory board for the Children’s Hospital of The King’s Daughters.


DAVID T. LOUGEE PRESIDENT AND CEO, TEGNA INC., TYSONS


The past year has been eventful for Lougee and Tegna, the Gannett Co. Inc. spinoff company that owns 68 television stations in 54 markets, earning $2.9 billion in 2020. The company was enmeshed in a proxy battle earlier this year with major- ity stakeholder Standard General LP, which argued that Tegna did not seriously consider purchasing offers last year from Gray Television and Apollo Global Management Inc.


Lougee, the former executive vice president of media relations for Belo Corp., a company purchased by Gannett in 2013, landed in hot water earlier this year when details came to light of a 2014 incident in which Lougee mistook a Black board nominee for a parking valet following an industry event. He apologized to Adonis Hoffman, who withdrew his nomination to Tegna’s board in 2014, but Hoffman wrote in a letter to Lougee that he took issue with the CEO’s failure to apologize or accept responsibility for the incident until it was made public in 2021. A member of the boards of BMI and the Broadcasters Foundation of America, Lougee is also a past chairman of the National Association of Broadcasters and the NBC Affiliates Board.


140 VIRGINIA 500


As the head of PBS, the nation’s largest noncommercial broadcasting network, Kerger has the distinction of being its longest-serving top executive, becoming its president and CEO in 2006. During Kerger’s tenure, PBS, which employs around 550, has seen its audiences grow, moving from the 14th most-watched network in America to No. 7 in the course of a decade, with more than 100 million monthly broadcast viewers. Programming under Kerger’s watch has included the wildly successful period drama “Downton Abbey,” the Ken Burns and Lynn Novick docuseries “The Vietnam War” and the children’s show “Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood.” Kerger also launched the PBS Kids 24/7 broadcast and streaming channel in 2017 and oversaw the development of PBS LearningMedia to provide content for teachers in the class- room. She is regularly included in The Hollywood Reporter’s “Women in Entertainment Power 100.”


A director of the International Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and a member of Meredith Corp.’s board of directors, Kerger was previously executive vice president and chief oper- ating officer of the Educational Broadcasting Corp., the parent company of WNET New York.


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