search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
MANUFACTURING CHARLES ‘CHARLIE’


LUCK IV PRESIDENT AND CEO, LUCK COS., MANAKIN-SABOT


Luck leads the nearly century-old stone products company founded by his grand- father and led for decades by his father, the late Charles S. Luck III, who died in December 2020 at age 87. Charlie Luck, too, has been with the company for most of his life. He was a trainee while attending Virginia Military Institute, where he earned a civil engi- neering degree. He also spent time as a NASCAR driver, competing in what is now the Xfinity Series. Aſter years working in the family


business, Luck became president and CEO of the Luck Cos. in 1999.


The company stresses leadership, integ-


rity, commitment and creativity as pillars, and Luck has written that his life’s purpose is “to help develop people and position them to exceed their wildest dreams.” In 2015, Luck founded the nonprofit Innerwill, which aims to help people and organizations with leadership development. Luck Cos. expanded to Georgia aſter a 2018 acquisition. “We saw all of the megatrends point to population growth in the Southeast,” Luck told Pit & Quarry in April 2020. “We also looked at where we felt our values and beliefs would culturally match the best.”


FRANKY MARCHAND VICE PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER, NEW RIVER VALLEY PLANT, VOLVO TRUCKS NORTH AMERICA, DUBLIN


This summer brought a labor standoff to Marchand’s New River Valley Plant, where nearly 3,000 United Auto Workers went on strike off and on for more than two months before reaching a labor contract agreement in July.


Marchand defended what he deemed Volvo’s competitive package of benefits and improve-


ments in June, saying, “It is difficult to understand this action.” Marchand earned his mechanical and industrial engineering degree from then-École


Nationale Supérieure d’Arts et Métiers in France. He began his career as an industrial engineer for Mack Trucks Australia and joined Volvo Trucks North America in 2002. In 2014, he was appointed vice president and general manager of the Dublin plant, the


largest Volvo truck manufacturing facility in the world. It’s located on 556 acres along Interstate 81, where the company announced a $400 million expansion of the plant in 2019. While it has also announced hundreds of layoffs, the company says it will achieve a net increase of approximately 600 positions at the plant this year.


PETER MAYR MANAGING DIRECTOR, LIEBHERR USA CO., NEWPORT NEWS


Mayr moved to the United States in 2013 to become president of Liebherr Construction Equipment Co. Three years later, the Swiss-based, family-owned parent company reorganized its U.S. operations as Liebherr USA Co., and Mayr became a managing director. The company marked its 50th anniversary in the United States last year. Mayr earned an international economics degree from


the University of Innsbruck in Austria in 2001 and began his Liebherr career in sales. He became managing director of Liebherr Great Britain Ltd. in 2012. The company employs 1,200 people in the United States, and Liebherr USA encompasses eight divisions across the country, with Mayr overseeing 520 employees in Newport News. He also saw the completion of a $60 million expansion there. The manufacturing complex, a five-minute drive from Newport News Shipbuilding, repairs cranes and makes construction and mining equipment.


GARY M. MIGNOGNA PRESIDENT AND CEO, FRAMATOME INC., LYNCHBURG


Mignogna oversees the North American operations of Framatome, which says it’s serviced every U.S. nuclear energy facility and helps power 36 million American homes. The company employs 1,300 workers in Lynchburg, where it’s done business for more than 50 years. Mignogna relocated Framatome’s headquarters there from Charlotte, North Carolina, in 2018. In March, Framatome launched an independent subsidiary, Framatome U.S. Government Solutions LLC, to oversee its federal contracting business, including work for the Energy and Defense departments. Mignogna chairs its board.


Mignogna’s career in the nuclear


industry has spanned four decades. He’s been president and CEO of Framatome and its predecessor, AREVA Inc., since 2014. He also sits on the executive committee


of the Nuclear Energy Institute’s board of directors, is chairman of the National D-Day Memorial Foundation’s board of directors and serves on the board of Beacon of Hope, which helps Lynchburg City School students prepare for education aſter high school. A graduate of Drexel University, where he


also received his master’s degree in mechani- cal engineering, Mignogna is a trustee at the University of Lynchburg, where he earned his MBA.


JOHN


PARKINSON CEO, DRAKE EXTRUSION INC., RIDGEWAY


Despite the pandemic, Parkinson announced plans in June 2020 for a


$6.9 million second manufacturing facility in Henry County. The move came a couple of months aſter the yarn maker retained 195 jobs using a $2.05 million PPP loan, the Martinsville Bulletin reported. The company promised an additional 30 jobs would accompany the expansion. By February 2021, Drake was telling The Wall Street Journal that the factory was facing a “bottleneck” as it tried to keep up with increas- ing consumer demand for furniture and other products that use its yarn.


An accounting and finance graduate of


the U.K.’s Lancaster University, Parkinson has been CEO at Drake since 2001. The company is owned by Swiss filament yarn and staple fiber manufacturer Duroc AB. Parkinson is a member of the GO Virginia


Region 3 Council and serves as secretary- treasurer of Virginia Career Works West Piedmont Region, part of the state’s workforce development initiative. He also serves on the board of the Martinsville-Henry County Chamber’s Partnership for Economic Growth, the chamber’s charitable affiliate.


134 VIRGINIA 500


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196