search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
STEVE HIRE PRESIDENT, CHEMTREAT INC., GLEN ALLEN


Hire leads ChemTreat, an indus- trial water-treatment company that’s part of the environmental and supplied solutions portfolio of Washington, D.C.-based Danaher Corp. ChemTreat, founded in 1968, was purchased in 2007 by Danaher — where Hire had worked a two-year stint as corporate director of DBS Growth Tools. Hire became president in March 2010. He earned a marketing degree from the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management and spent six years as a brand manager for Cooper Hand Tools. Hire also held executive positions at Delta Consolidated Industries and Acuity Brands Lighting. In September, ChemTreat opened an applied technology lab in Ashland, where it broke ground in 2019. The company said it invested $10 million in the 25,000-square-foot facility for product innovation, aiming to create 20 jobs in the next 10 years. It’s located in the Hanover County Airpark, across from the ChemTreat East Coast manufacturing hub.


JEREMY R. HOFF CEO, HOOKER FURNITURE CO., MARTINSVILLE


Hoff took over Feb. 1 as Hooker’s fourth CEO — the first nonfamily member to hold the job since J. Clyde Hooker founded the company in 1924. Hoff succeeded the founder’s grandson Paul B. Toms Jr., who led the company for 20 years and remains board chairman. Hooker employs 800 people at its Virginia and North Carolina locations, oper- ates 12 divisions and says it’s one of the top five sources for the U.S. furniture market. Hoff entered the furniture industry aſter graduating from Indiana University Bloomington with a business marketing degree. He worked for more than 17 years as a sales rep for the Huntington House, Pulaski, Universal and Craſtmaster furniture brands. Aſter executive positions with the Broyhill and A.R.T. furniture companies, he became president of Theodore Alexander USA Inc. in December 2015. He joined Hooker in 2017. Hoff also serves as board vice president of the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Blue Ridge. Shareholders will be watching for Hoff to shore things up aſter a tough year. He started as CEO at the end of fiscal 2021, when the company blamed the pandemic for a nearly 12% drop in revenue to $540.08 million.


SCOTT


KEOGH CEO AND PRESIDENT, VOLKSWAGEN GROUP OF AMERICA INC., HERNDON


A New York native and graduate of Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Keogh spent more than a decade in management with Mercedes-Benz USA before joining Volkswagen in 2006 through Audi of America, serving six years as chief market- ing officer and six as president. In 2018, Keogh was tapped to head


Volkswagen Group of America. He oversees the brand in the United States, Mexico and Canada, as well as the automaker’s other high-end brands in the United States. He champions electric vehicles and


PRABHAT K. JAIN CEO, VIRGINIA TRANSFORMER CORP., ROANOKE


Virginia Transformer, owned by Jain’s family, is the second-largest power trans- former manufacturing company in North America. It celebrates its 50th anniver- sary this year — and next year, Jain will mark his 40th year as its CEO. Jain is an engineer and multiple patentholder with a degree in mechan- ical engineering from Indian Institute of Technology Madras. Aſter moving to the United States in 1968, he earned his master’s degree in material science from Villanova University in Pennsylvania and his MBA from Lynchburg University. Jain was a design manager for General Electric Co. in Salem for five years before


acquiring the 35-employee Virginia Transformer Corp. in May 1982. In 2014, the company acquired


Georgia Transformer Corp., and the com- pany now employs 1,400 people. Jain has made it a mission to create power transformers that can last 60 years, telling The Roanoke Times that it’s the company’s “single most important achievement.” Jain helped fund a STEM education


initiative for Roanoke students. A former chair of the Virginia/DC District Export Council, he has served on the boards of the Roanoke Chamber of Commerce and the United Way of Roanoke Valley.


has said Volkswagen plans “to be the world’s largest manufacturer of electric cars” by 2030. The second quarter offered a hopeful sign for the company, which reported its best quarterly sales total since 1973. Almost 5% of models sold were the new ID.4 crossovers, at an MSRP of $39,995. Volkswagen’s EV enthusiasm created problems for Keogh aſter a poorly received April Fool’s “gag,” as he referred to it to Reuters. The company issued a seemingly straightforward press release announcing the company’s rebrand to “Voltswagen.” Der Spiegel and other outlets reported that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission “opened an inquiry” into the matter.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 133


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196