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HOWARD BROADFOOT PRESIDENT AND CEO, ELECTRO-MECHANICAL CORP., BRISTOL


Broadfoot became head of the privately held Electro-Mechanical on June 1 aſter the retirement of Russell Leonard, who remains on the company’s board. The company, which makes electrical distribution systems and components, traces its roots to Electric Motor Repair and Sales, a repair business that set up shop in Bristol in 1958. Broadfoot, who joined Electro- Mechanical as chief operating officer in 2009, now oversees a company with manufacturing facilities that cover nearly 1 million square feet in Virginia, Texas and Mexico. Its divisions include Line Power and Federal Pacific. As some of its coal-related business declined in the late 2000s, the company explored the data center market. It also found success through custom engineering systems.


Broadfoot holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial management and an MBA from the University of North Alabama. He served as vice president of operations with Thomas & Betts and director of operations at Newell Brands subsidiary Rubbermaid before coming to Bristol.


RÉGIS BROERSMA PRESIDENT, GENERAL CIGAR CO. INC., GLEN ALLEN


Broersma got into the cigar business right aſter graduating from Utrecht University and earning his master’s degree in business economics from Tilburg University, both in the Netherlands. He has worked in six countries for the Scandinavian Tobacco Group (STG), which he joined in 2002. In April 2020, as part of a reorgani- zation, he was named senior vice president of the company’s new North American Branded and Rest of World Division.


In that role, he also serves as president of STG’s cigar subsidiary, Glen Allen-based General Cigar Co. Inc., a role he previously held.


General Cigar exports to 62 countries and is the biggest retailer of hand-rolled cigars in the United States — “by far,” as Cigar Journal put it. The company makes the Macanudo and Cohiba brands (among others), cultivates tobacco and manufactures its handmade cigars in Dominican, Honduran and Nicaraguan factories. STG reported $1.28 billion in 2020 revenue.


In December 2020, Broersma told Cigar Journal that sales during the pandemic were “through the roof,” with “double-digit growth” and factories at 140% capacity.


ALAN CONNOR PRESIDENT AND CEO, CADENCE INC., STAUNTON


In 2012, Connor was tapped as president and CEO of Cadence Inc., which engineers and makes high-tech medical devices, including minimally invasive surgical technology. The Pittsburgh native stayed close to home while he earned a degree in industrial engineering from Penn State and his MBA


from the University of Pittsburgh. He had a stint as a consultant with former “Big Five” accounting firm Arthur Andersen before joining Medrad, which has since been purchased by Bayer AG, becom- ing its director of global marketing. He also worked in operations at MicroAire Surgical Instruments before joining Cadence in 2011. Based in Staunton, Cadence’s Virginia headquarters and manufacturing facilities are 95,000 square feet. The company announced the addition of a Class 8 clean room there in October, saying it would be used to more quickly develop and manufacture novel medical devices.


Cadence employs more than 500 people in Virginia, Connecticut, Pennsylvania,


Rhode Island and Wisconsin. Connor, who is a pilot, serves as board chairman of Virginia Bio, the state biotech trade association.


M. SCOTT CULBRETH PRESIDENT AND CEO, AMERICAN WOODMARK, WINCHESTER


Culbreth completed his first year as CEO at American Woodmark in July, overseeing 5.7% annual revenue growth at the Winchester-based cabinet company, bringing its annual sales to $1.74 billion. Culbreth oversees a company with 10,000 employees and 17 manufacturing facilities in the United States and Mexico. Woodmark says it makes a cabinet every two seconds — some 41,000 cabinets a day. Brands include Shenandoah Cabinetry, Villa Bath and the allen + roth line, which is exclusive to Lowe’s. Wood prices and other costs have increased along with demand, Culbreth noted


in May, saying that he would be focused on increasing production while tackling that dynamic. A native of Charlotte, North Carolina, Culbreth is a Virginia Tech graduate who


serves on the Finance Advisory Board for Pamplin College of Business. He earned his MBA from Washington University in St. Louis. Aſter Tech, Culbreth went to work for Shell Oil Co. and held executive positions at Robert Bosch LLC and Newell Brands. Before his appointment to CEO of Woodmark, he served as chief financial officer for six and a half years.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 131


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