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MANUFACTURING


R. MARCUS ‘MARC’ AMMEN CEO, UNIVERSAL FIBER SYSTEMS LLC, BRISTOL


Progress hinges on your ability to adapt to change.” MANMEET S. BHATIA


Ammen has led the Bristol-based fiber man- ufacturer for 12 years, overseeing its two busi- ness units — Universal Fiber, which makes solution-dyed, synthetic


filament-based fibers, and Premiere Fibers Inc., based in North Carolina, which produces man- made fibers. Founded in 1969, the company also has manufacturing facilities in Europe, Thailand and China. Its markets span such industries as flooring, military, apparel, transportation and industrial use.


Universal Fiber has been recognized for its


sustainable practices, including an award for Environmental Excellence and Community Impact by the Southwest Virginia Alliance of Manufacturers. In June 2021, it expanded the health clinic it


started seven years ago at its manufacturing facility for employees and their family members. A Clemson University graduate, Ammen joined


Universal in 2000 as its chief financial officer and served as president of its Universal Fibers division. As part of the company’s global growth strategy, he helped cut the ribbon on a new plant in Poland in 2019.


BRAD BEAUCHAMP PRESIDENT AND CEO, CARPENTER CO., HENRICO COUNTY


Beauchamp, who joined Carpenter Co. in 2008, was tapped as CEO of the privately owned, Henrico County-based manufacturer in the wake of former chairman and CEO Stanley F. Pauley’s death in November 2020.


A philanthropist and venerable presence at


MANMEET S. BHATIA PRESIDENT AND CEO, TMEIC CORP. AMERICAS, ROANOKE


When Toshiba Mitsubishi-Electric Industrial Systems Corp. (TMEIC) decided in April to consolidate its two U.S. operations, it tapped Bhatia to take the helm. Bhatia, who’d served as chief operating officer of the Roanoke com- pany since 2019, had been with TMEIC since 2003. He also serves on the board of TMEIC International Corp. and TMEIC Canada Corp.


TMEIC Corp. Americas, which has operations in Roanoke and Katy, Texas, employs 285 people in Virginia and 496 worldwide. It designs and develops advanced automation systems, large AC and DC motors, and photovol- taic inverters.


Before his tenure with TMEIC, Bhatia held leadership roles in North America, Europe and Asia at General Electric Co.’s Industrial Drives and Control System Business.


Bhatia has a bachelor of engineering degree in electronics and communica- tions from Gulbarga University in India.


BEST ADVICE FOR OTHERS: Embrace change. Progress hinges on your ability to adapt to change.


SOMETHING I WOULD NEVER DO AGAIN: Eat snake meat


HOBBY/PASSION: Playing acoustic guitar


PERSON I ADMIRE: Mahatma Gandhi. He led a calm, nonviolent resistance to oppression and colonization, thereby inspiring movements for freedom and civil rights across the globe.


Carpenter, Pauley died at 93. Beauchamp had previ- ously served as president and chief operating officer since April 2018.


Carpenter was founded in 1948, and in 2020,


Forbes ranked it No. 212 on its list of “America’s Largest Private Companies,” citing revenue of $2 billion. The company makes flexible foam, fiber, air filtration media and other products at 16 plants, saying it’s the largest producer of comfort


cushioning products in the world. It employs about 4,500 people at 43 locations worldwide.


Earlier this year, the


company settled a 3-year-old lawsuit by former president and COO Michael Lowery, who claimed he was wrongly fired. The settlement amount was not disclosed. Beauchamp has degrees in biology and chemis-


try from Bethel University and earned his MBA at Southern Methodist University. He worked at Stepan Co. for 18 years before coming to Carpenter in 2008 as national sales manager for its chemical division. He became that division’s vice president in 2013.


MARTIN BJUVE PRESIDENT, VOLVO PENTA OF THE AMERICAS INC., CHESAPEAKE


Bjuve passed the one-year mark as president of Volvo Penta of the Americas in January, rising to the position aſter two years as senior vice president and chief financial officer. Part of the Volvo Group, Volvo Penta makes engines and power solutions for leisure and commercial boats and other industrial uses. Based in Chesapeake, it sells products through 3,500 dealers in 130 countries. It also has an engine test facility in Suffolk. In March, the company launched a new assisted docking system for the marine industry. In June, the company announced that it had acquired a major- ity stake in ZEM AS, a Norwegian marine battery systems supplier. Bjuve, who oversees operations in North, Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean, has an MBA from Karlstad University in Sweden, his native country. He’s spent 17 years with Volvo, including as head of business support, based in Sweden, for the European region of Volvo Penta. He moved to Chesapeake to serve as CFO and became vice president of customer support and training at Volvo Penta of the Americas. A fan of boating, Bjuve enjoys wakesurfing and kitesurfing on the Chesapeake Bay.


130 VIRGINIA 500


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