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THURSTON R. MOORE CHAIRMAN EMERITUS AND SPECIAL COUNSEL, HUNTON ANDREWS KURTH LLP, RICHMOND


A Richmond native, Moore received his bachelor’s and law degrees from the University of Virginia and joined the state’s now-second-largest law firm right aſter graduation in 1974. Moore’s expertise lies in corporate and securities represen- tation, with particular emphasis on corporate financing and governance, venture capital, real estate investment trusts and partnership law. His tenure at Hunton Andrews Kurth includes seven years as chairman of its executive committee and 15 as managing partner. He has a particular interest in educational missions. Moore is board chairman emeritus of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation and chairs the board of NextUp RVA, an aſter-school program for Richmond middle school students. He also serves as president of the Mary Morton Parsons


Foundation, which funds nonprofit organizations in and around Richmond, awarding about $128 million since 1988.


FAVORITE APP: PictureThis for plant identification


MOST RECENT BOOK READ: “Rescuing the Planet: Protecting Half the Land to Heal the Earth,” by Tony Hiss


WHAT I WOULD CHANGE ABOUT VIRGINIA: Giving the public more access to the culture of our state through museums and teaching more history in the schools


RICHARD H. OTTINGER PRESIDENT, VIRGINIA BAR ASSOCIATION; PARTNER, VANDEVENTER BLACK LLP, NORFOLK


COURTNEY MOATES PAULK PRESIDENT, HIRSCHLER, RICHMOND


Paulk was named the 75-year-old firm’s first female presi- dent in 2018 and heads its litigation practice. Her expertise in the construction industry has garnered recognitions in Best Lawyers in America, Chambers USA and Virginia Super Lawyers. She represents developers and


contractors on claims and dispute resolution, contracts and industry-specific issues such as defective work, mechanics liens and payment bonds. Paulk is a member of the Associated General Contractors and the Virginia State Bar’s Construction Law and Public Contracts Section, as well as a fellow of the American Bar Foundation. With 86 attorneys, Hirschler has offices in Richmond, Fredericksburg and


Tysons, and it has had a real-estate practice since the 1970s. A Virginia native, Paulk is a graduate of the University of Mary Washington and


the University of Richmond School of Law. Outside of legal circles, Paulk is well known as a competitive open-water swim-


mer. She is the only person to complete the “Triple Crown of Open Water Swimming” four times — circling Manhattan and crossing the English and Catalina channels. Paulk also volunteers with SwimRVA, a nonprofit community aquatics organi- zation, and serves on the board of Richmond Sports Backers.


Recognized for his expertise in admi- ralty and maritime law, Ottinger currently serves as president of the Virginia Bar Association, the nation’s oldest voluntary organization for attorneys. Among the VBA’s goals are completing its strategic plan and building membership and relation- ships with law schools.


The association, which is known for its Virginia guberna- torial candidates’ debate held at the Omni Homestead Resort every four years, decided this year to cancel the event aſter Republican nominee Glenn Youngkin declined to participate. An experienced litigator at Vandeventer Black, Ottinger focuses on intellectual property disputes, tort defense, transportation and maritime litigation, and complex trust and estate disputes for clients ranging from international man- ufacturing companies to small partnerships. He also serves on the firm’s executive board and co-chairs its government relations committee.


Ottinger’s recognitions include Virginia Lawyers Weekly’s “Leaders in the Law” in 2020 and the Virginia Bar Association Young Lawyers Division’s Sandra P. Thompson Award. He’s a graduate of Boston University and the William


& Mary School of Law and currently serves on the boards of the Norfolk Economic Development Authority and the Downtown Norfolk Council.


JAY MYERSON PRESIDENT, VIRGINIA STATE BAR; FOUNDER AND OWNER, THE MYERSON LAW GROUP PC, RESTON


Myerson, former president of the Fairfax Bar Association, is serving as the 2021-22 president of the Virginia State Bar. Unlike the Virginia Bar Association, which is an inde- pendent nonprofit organization for Virginia attorneys, the


state bar is an administrative agency for the Supreme Court of Virginia but does not receive state tax dollars.


A double graduate of Georgetown University, Myerson practiced civil litigation


and ERISA for two years as an associate, was a litigation and enforcement attorney for the Federal Election Commission from 1978 to 1980, and returned to private practice as a partner at Israel & Raley for six years. In 1986, he founded his small liti- gation practice, which specializes in family law, criminal defense and civil disputes. A member of the state bar’s executive committee since 2018, Myerson has


volunteered his time with the budget and finance committee and served for six years on its legal ethics committee. Over the years, he has been honored by the Fairfax Bar Association and the Virginia State Bar multiple times. He also has been inducted as a fellow in the Virginia Law Foundation.


WENDY COLLINS PERDUE


Perdue had a long teaching career as associ- ate dean and professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center before becoming dean of the University of Richmond School of Law in 2011. Her areas of expertise include civil proce- dure, conflict of laws and land use. Recognizing the 150th anniversary of UR’s law school in 2020, Perdue wrote an op-ed col- umn in the Richmond Times-Dispatch, focusing on attorneys serving the needs of community members compassionately and ethically. A graduate of Wellesley College and the Duke University School of Law, where she was


DEAN, UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND SCHOOL OF LAW, RICHMOND


editor-in-chief of the law journal, Perdue began her career at Hogan & Hartson in Washington, D.C., aſter clerking for then-Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Anthony M. Kennedy, who later was named to the U.S. Supreme Court. Perdue is widely published in her areas of practice. She was the editor of the two-volume “Procedure and Private International Law” (2017). Perdue is the immediate past president of the Association of American Law Schools and a former vice president of Order of the Coif, an honor society for law school graduates.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 123


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