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LAW


JONATHAN P. HARMON CHAIRMAN, McGUIREWOODS LLP, RICHMOND


A graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, Harmon is a Gulf War veteran who served in the Army’s 1st Cavalry Division, and he has headed McGuireWoods since 2017. A nationally recognized trial lawyer who formerly led the firm’s business and securities litigation department, he is its first Black chairman and a leader for the firm’s diversity and inclusion initiatives. Harmon’s notable clients include Yahoo!, International Paper Co., United Parcel Service and DuPont. In many instances, he is “parachuted” into


high-profile cases a short time before trial — a sort of secret weapon who nets multimil- lion-dollar results. He’s a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers and the Virginia Law


Foundation, as well as a board member of the Pro Bono Institute, and Harmon also was included in The Best Lawyers in America for 2021. A graduate of the University of Texas School of Law, Harmon participates in a mentorship program for local high school students interested in legal careers. He has for several years led Bible-study classes for prisoners through Faith Landmarks Ministries.


BRANT J. HELLWIG PROFESSOR OF LAW, WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW, LEXINGTON


An expert in the field of federal taxation, Hellwig taught partnership, cor- porate, and estate and giſt taxation at Washington and Lee University from 2012 until 2015, when he was named dean. In 2020,


he announced he would return to full-time faculty aſter a sabbatical, stepping down as dean in June 2021. Michelle Lyon Drumbl, the Robert O. Bentley Professor of Law and director of W&L’s Tax Clinic, is serving as interim dean. A Wake Forest University and New York


THOMAS C. INGLIMA MANAGING PARTNER, WILLCOX SAVAGE PC, NORFOLK


Inglima, who specializes in mergers and acquisitions, replaced Robert L. Dewey as the firm’s managing partner in June 2021, aſter having served as a member of Willcox Savage’s management committee for two decades and as chair of its compensation committee. He also previously chaired the firm’s corporate, securities and finance practice group.


The firm, which has 60 attorneys in three offices (Norfolk, Virginia Beach and Tysons), celebrated its 125th anniversary last year and boasts 29 practice areas ranging from banking and intellectual property to transportation and mari- time law. Real estate is its one of its largest practices, with 11 attorneys.


A graduate of Duke University and Georgetown


University Law Center, Inglima was lead counsel to Landmark Communications Inc. when the Norfolk media company sold its flagship property, The Weather Channel, to NBCUniversal for a reported $3.5 billion. He also has represented Dominion Enterprises in several sales and is general counsel to the Hampton Roads Transportation Accountability Commission, which oversees major traffic projects in the region.


University alumnus, Hellwig is credited with leading the law school through a difficult financial period and hiring more minority and female educators, who now make up 50% of the school’s faculty. Students named him “Faculty Member of the Year” in 2020. Hellwig is widely published in law review jour- nals and academic textbooks, including “The United States Tax Court: An Historical Analysis,” commis- sioned by the U.S. Tax Court. His published works tackle topics ranging from federal estate and giſt taxation to the estate tax treatment of closely held business entities employed as trust substitutes. Prior to W&L, Hellwig taught at the University of South Carolina School of Law for a decade.


JOHN ‘JACK’


LAVOIE PARTNER IN CHARGE — RESTON, COOLEY LLP, RESTON


DONALD W. LEMONS CHIEF JUSTICE, SUPREME COURT OF VIRGINIA, RICHMOND


Born in Washington, D.C., Lemons has served as a judge or justice at every level of Virginia’s judiciary. He was named the 26th chief justice of the Virginia Supreme Court by his fellow justices in 2015 aſter 15 years of service on the commonwealth’s highest court. Lemons also is a well-regarded educator who’s currently a distin- guished professor of judicial studies at Washington and Lee University; he formerly served as assistant law dean at the University of Virginia, his alma mater. He also was an adjunct professor of law at the University of Richmond’s law school. Reared in Northern Virginia — his father was a Secret Service agent on the protection detail for President Harry S. Truman — Lemons started out as a probation officer for the Fairfax County Juvenile & Domestic Relations District Court. Lemons was in private law practice for 18 years before his 1995 judicial appointment to the Richmond Circuit Court, where he created a pioneering “drug court” for nonviolent offenders. The General Assembly elected him to Virginia’s Court of Appeals in 1998. The former president of the American Inns of Court also received the Lewis F. Powell Jr. Award for Professionalism and Ethics in 2019.


122 VIRGINIA 500


The head of Cooley’s real estate practice group, Lavoie focuses on com- mercial transactions, including the pur- chase, sale, and development and leasing of office, industrial, retail and technology-driven properties. He has represented buyers and sellers, landlords and tenants, and corporations and individuals. He estab- lished a subspecialty representing clean and renew- able energy projects, including the development of wind and solar lease farms and related installations. A graduate of Catholic University and the Georgetown University Law Center, Lavoie joined the Palo Alto, California-based law firm in 2008, handling transactions throughout the Washington, D.C., metro area and mid-Atlantic region with retail projects including Tysons Corner Center and Potomac Mills.


Before joining Cooley, Lavoie was a partner at


Watt, Tieder, Hoffar & Fitzgerald, a firm specializing in construction and surety law in five cities, and Staubach Co., a real estate advisory firm. A classmate of Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, Lavoie served on the transition committee aſter McAuliffe was elected in 2013. Lavoie is a member of the National Association of Industrial and Office Properties and the Greater Washington Commercial Association of Realtors. He cites American history and Minor League Baseball among his passions.


Thomas C. Inglima photo by Mark Rhodes


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