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THOMAS R. FRANTZ CHAIRMAN EMERITUS AND PARTNER, WILLIAMS MULLEN, VIRGINIA BEACH


In Frantz’s 47 years at Williams Mullen, he has served as the firm’s chair- man, CEO and president, all while advising mul- tinational corporations, handling major mergers and acquisitions, and


lecturing on tax and corporate law at local univer- sities and national professional associations. Chair of the GO Virginia Region 5 Council,


he has served on numerous community boards, including the Hampton Roads Community Foundation and the Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce. Frantz also sits on the board of Miller Energy


Inc. and Virginia Beach-based DroneUp, an aerial drone solutions company in which Walmart recently invested and for which Frantz served as an adviser. A William & Mary graduate with three degrees, he sat on W&M’s board of visitors for nine years and also serves on its Real Estate Foundation board. The retired U.S. Army captain also was King Neptune XXIII at the Virginia Beach Neptune Festival in 1996.


BEVERAGE OF CHOICE: California cabernet RECENT READ: “A Gambling Man,” by David Baldacci


WHAT I WOULD CHANGE ABOUT VIRGINIA: More focus on strengthening its regions.


RISA L. GOLUBOFF DEAN, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA SCHOOL OF LAW, CHARLOTTESVILLE


The 12th dean of the University of Virginia School of Law is also its first female dean. Goluboff assumed the post in 2015 aſter a 13-year professorship, during which she directed the university’s J.D.-M.A. in History program. In December, she was appointed to a second five-year term as dean. Last year’s entering class was the most


diverse in the law school’s history, with more than half of the students made up of women and 33% identifying as people of color. Long interested in social justice, Goluboff taught sociology at the University of Cape Town in South Africa as a Fulbright Scholar and is an award-winning author of two books, “The Lost Promise of Civil Rights” and “Vagrant Nation: Police Power, Constitutional Change, and the Making of the 1960s.” The latter project was supported by a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. At U.Va., she teaches law and history, and Goluboff has received the school’s Carl


McFarland Prize and its All-University Teaching Award. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Harvard, master’s and doctoral degrees from Princeton University and a J.D. from Yale Law School. She clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer.


DOUGLAS S. GRANGER MANAGING PARTNER, RICHMOND OFFICE, HUNTON ANDREWS KURTH LLP, RICHMOND


ROGER L. GREGORY CHIEF JUDGE, U.S. COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE FOURTH CIRCUIT, RICHMOND


Born in Philadelphia but with deep roots in Virginia, Gregory was appointed in 2000 by President Bill Clinton, becoming the first Black person to sit on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. He


was renominated by President George W. Bush in 2001, achieving another milestone as the first federal appellate court appointee by presidents of opposing political parties. Gregory’s political standing was long in the making as co-founder of Wilder & Gregory, the Richmond firm he started with former Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder, the nation’s first elected Black governor. Gregory graduated from Virginia State University and the University of Michigan Law School. Appointed chief judge in 2016, Gregory’s


notable opinions have humanitarian leanings. In 2014, he joined the majority opinion declaring Virginia’s ban on same-sex marriage unconstitu- tional. In 2017, he upheld a lower court’s injunc- tion blocking President Donald Trump’s travel ban on refugees and nationals from certain countries. A member of the Judicial Conference of the


United States, Gregory has served on the boards of the Industrial Development Authority of Richmond, Leadership Metro Richmond and ChildFund International. He is a trustee emeritus for the University of Richmond.


A lifetime career at Virginia’s second-largest law firm — first joining what was then Hunton & Williams as a summer associate in 1984 — culminated with Granger being named managing partner of the firm’s Richmond office in 2017. Over his decades there, he has developed expertise working with multinational companies on corporate mergers and acquisitions across a wide range of industry sectors: energy, building/construction, media and telecommunications, public utility, tobacco, insurance, railroads and health care.


Granger is especially versed in U.K. strategic acquisitions and was lead counsel for several M&A Atlas Award-winning multibillion-dollar deals. Now a global firm with more than 1,000 attorneys in 19 cities and two client centers,


Hunton employs 200 attorneys in its Richmond headquarters office. A graduate of William & Mary and the University of Virginia School of Law, the Richmond native has served on boards for the American Heart Association and the Maymont Foundation. The father of four has coached football, basketball and baseball and volunteers with United Way, the YWCA and the Boy Scouts, parlaying his interest in sports as a board member of the Tuckahoe YMCA and Avalon Recreation Association.


MARGARET F. HARDY SHAREHOLDER, PRESIDENT, SANDS ANDERSON PC, FREDERICKSBURG


A triumvirate of skills and experience has served Hardy well in her role as president of Sands Anderson, a firm that includes health care and related regulatory issues among its practice areas. A registered nurse with an MBA from Old Dominion University and a law degree from William & Mary, Hardy is the managing shareholder in the firm’s Fredericksburg office, representing health care providers, agencies and facilities in malpractice actions. Hardy joined the firm more than 20 years ago as a summer associate, becoming its president in 2017. Also the president of the Virginia Women Attorneys Association, she is fre- quently named to professional “best of” lists among law associations. She serves as legal coun- sel for the Fredericksburg Regional Chamber of Commerce and is on the board of trustees for Mary Washington Healthcare, UMFS and the Community Foundation of the Rappahannock River Region.


In her spare time, Hardy is a fiber artist, raising Angora goats and spinning their wool for yarn she uses in her art. She also likes riding motorcycles.


FAVORITE BOOK: “To Kill a Mockingbird,” by Harper Lee www.VirginiaBusiness.com 121


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