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HOSPITALIT Y/TOURISM


NEIL P. AMIN CEO, SHAMIN HOTELS, RICHMOND


The past year has been a bit of a mixed bag for Amin and Shamin Hotels, one of the United States’ largest independent hoteliers. Shamin, which owns more than 60 hotels, saw its Hilton Richmond Hotel and


Spa in Short Pump enter receivership in January aſter falling behind on loan payments amid the pandemic.


That said, Shamin completed renovations on The Landing at


Hampton Marina this year, and the company purchased a Hampton Inn & Suites in Newport News along with three Virginia Beach hotels. Amin is also one of 50 investors in Richmond’s proposed ONE Casino + Resort. In July, Amin was tapped as one of the state’s five cannabis regu-


latory board members.


Amin earned his bachelor’s and MBA degrees from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania before joining Shamin as chief financial officer in 2002. He was named CEO in 2008.


BEST ADVICE FOR OTHERS: Don’t ask others to do anything that you would not do yourself.


NEW LIFE EXPERIENCE: Climbing Grays Peak (14,278 feet) and Torreys Peak (14,267 feet) in Colorado this past July


THOMAS J. BALTIMORE JR. CHAIRMAN, PRESIDENT AND CEO, PARK HOTELS & RESORTS INC., TYSONS


A lodging real estate investment trust, Park Hotels has a portfolio with 57 hotels and resorts, offering more than 32,000 rooms.


While weathering the pandemic, Park temporar-


ily closed some hotels. Properties that remained open saw a sharp drop in reservations. For 2020, the company reported $852 million in revenue, a 70% decrease from 2019.


That said, Baltimore, who has led Park since 2016, when he joined the com- pany shortly before its spinoff from Hilton, believes the storm may be passing. “I continue to be extremely encouraged by our portfolio’s performance


over the past several months,” he said in a June statement. “Leisure demand trends continue to accelerate at a faster pace than we had initially anticipated.” From April through December 2020, Baltimore waived his base salary, contributing $500,000 to a $2.5 million fund to address hardship among employees. Even so, he received $12.66 million in total compensation for the year, about a 54% increase over what he received in 2019. Baltimore earned his bachelor’s degree and MBA from the University of


Virginia. He’s a member of the board of directors of American Express Co. and Prudential Financial Inc.


LESLIE GREENE BOWMAN PRESIDENT, THOMAS JEFFERSON FOUNDATION, CHARLOTTESVILLE


Since 2008, Bowman has led the Thomas Jefferson Foundation, which owns and oper- ates Monticello, the Albemarle County estate of America’s third president. It’s a high-profile job. In 2013, Bowman sat next to musician Dave Matthews as he prepared to speak at Monticello’s annual Independence Day Celebration and Naturalization Ceremony. A year later, she walked with President Barack Obama and French President François Hollande as they toured the historic site. For all her time in the public eye, Bowman is, at heart, an academic. Aſter earning her bachelor’s in American history and art history


at Miami University, Bowman received a master’s degree in early American culture as a Winterthur Fellow at the University of Delaware.


Throughout Bowman’s tenure at


Monticello, she’s worked to create educa- tional programming that showcases the “honest, inclusive” history of the free and enslaved people who lived at the historic mountaintop home. “In Jefferson’s words, we ‘follow truth wher-


ever it may lead,’” Bowman said in a statement about Monticello creating an exhibit space ded- icated to Sally Hemings, the enslaved woman who bore at least six of Jefferson’s children.


DOUG BRADBURN PRESIDENT AND CEO, GEORGE WASHINGTON’S MOUNT VERNON, MOUNT VERNON


It’s an exclusive club. Just 11 individu- als have served as the leader at George Washington’s Mount Vernon since 1858, when the Mount Vernon Ladies’


Association purchased the estate from Washington’s heirs. A noted scholar of American history, Bradburn came to Mount


Vernon in 2013 to serve as the founding director of the Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington. He is the author and editor of three books and numerous articles on top- ics such as the history of the American founding and leadership. Only a few months aſter Bradburn joined Mount Vernon,


he inadvertently found himself at the center of a minor contro- versy when Politico reported that President Donald Trump had suggested to Bradburn during a 2018 tour of Mount Vernon that it would have been smarter for Washington to name the home aſter himself. The Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association criticized the story as inaccurate and lacking context. Bradburn graduated with degrees in history and economics


from the University of Virginia before earning his doctorate in history from The University of Chicago.


112 VIRGINIA 500


JAMES CARROLL PRESIDENT AND CEO, CRESTLINE HOTELS & RESORTS LLC, FAIRFAX


Carroll has led Crestline Hotels & Resorts LLC for more than a decade. He first arrived at the third- party hospitality management company in 2004 as its treasurer and later was named chief financial officer and then chief operating officer. An indirect subsidiary of the Barceló Group based in Mallorca, Spain, Crestline manages 125 hotels — properties with brands such as Marriott, Hilton and Hyatt, as well as independent hotels. The company employs more than 5,000 associates, about 600 of whom are in Virginia. While it was a grim year for the hotel industry overall, Crestline expanded its portfolio of managed hotels by 10% during the pandemic. Previously, Carroll worked at Dell Technologies Inc., where he held sev- eral operations and financial management positions, and served as a naval aviator and lieutenant commander in the U.S. Navy. He earned a bachelor’s degree in systems engineering from the U.S. Naval


Academy and an MBA from the Harvard Business School. Carroll sits on the board of directors for Armada Hoffler Properties Inc. in


Virginia Beach and ServiceSource, a nonprofit providing support services to people with disabilities.


BEST ADVICE FOR OTHERS: Take care of your team.


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