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WILLIAM B. ‘BILL’ DOWNEY CEO, RIVERSIDE HEALTH SYSTEM, NEWPORT NEWS


Downey first joined Riverside Health System 40 years ago as an administrative extern. Aſter receiving his master’s degree in health administration from the Medical College of Virginia (Virginia Commonwealth University), he rejoined Riverside as an assistant administrator. Aſter serving in many other positions at Riverside and elsewhere, including Salem’s Lewis-Gale Medical Center, he became Riverside’s CEO in 2012. Riverside, which serves Eastern


Virginia, has grown significantly under Downey’s leadership. He’s overseen a $90 million expansion of Riverside Regional Medical Center in Newport News, a $50 million ren- ovation and expansion of Riverside Walter Reed Hospital in Gloucester and a $35 million expansion of the continuing care community Patriots Colony at Williamsburg. Riverside sold its hospital and physician practices in the Northern Neck and upper Middle Peninsula to VCU Health System in 2021. Downey currently serves as a board member for the Virginia Chamber of Commerce and the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association, and in 2020 he received the Hampton Roads Community Action Program’s Community Builders award.


DR. ERIC EDWARDS CO-FOUNDER AND CEO, PHLOW CORP., RICHMOND


Pharmaceutical manufacturer Phlow Corp. was founded at a fortuitous time. Edwards launched the company in early 2020 with Frank Gupton, a department chair at Virginia Commonwealth University’s College of Engineering. In May 2020, the Trump administration awarded a four-year, $354 million contract


to Phlow to make COVID-19 medications, as well as other essential drugs.


Phlow’s larger aim is to establish a resilient and reli-


able domestic supply chain for manufacturing essential medicines and pharmaceutical ingredients. The company is moving fast: It has partnered with generic-drug maker Civica Inc. to open a $125 million plant in Petersburg, and it also announced an agreement to supply hard-to-find medicines to a nationwide coalition of children’s hospi- tals. Officials broke ground in May at the AMPAC Fine Chemicals plant in Petersburg. Edwards himself has extensive experience in pharma, having previously founded (with his twin brother) Kaléo Inc., a company that produces an injectable pen for allergy emergencies. With a medical degree and a Ph.D. from VCU, Edwards volunteers on a local rescue squad and trains paramedics in pre-hospital emergency care.


MICHAEL J. FRIEDLANDER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FRALIN BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE AT VTC, ROANOKE


A sophisticated magnetometry helmet that can read mag- netic signals from volunteers’ brains as they move around and interact with others. A focused ultrasound device that targets tissues deep in the body, treating movement disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. A COVID-19 Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory that has assisted health districts all over Virginia. The innovations never cease at the Fralin Biomedical


W. HEYWOOD


FRALIN CHAIRMAN, MEDICAL FACILITIES OF AMERICA INC.; CHAIRMAN, RETIREMENT UNLIMITED INC., ROANOKE


Fralin, one of Virginia Business’ “Eight over 80” honorees in 2021, is known for his indomitable energy. He is chairman of Medical Facilities of America, which operates 39 skilled nursing and rehabilitation centers in Virginia and North Carolina, and co-chairman of Retirement Unlimited, with 10 senior living communities in Virginia. He also has served on numerous boards, including a long stint as a member and former chair of the


influential State Council of Higher Education for Virginia. During his tenure, which ended in June, he was known for guiding SCHEV’s strategic planning and emphasiz- ing the state’s return on investment for supporting higher education. Fralin’s generous philanthropy has leſt a lasting mark on Virginia’s flagship institu- tions. In December 2019, along with the Horace G. Fralin Charitable Trust, Fralin and his wife, Cynthia, gave $50 million toward the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC, part of the Virginia Tech Carilion Health Sciences and Technology Campus in Roanoke. At the University of Virginia, his alma mater, the Fralins donated $5 million last year to create the Cynthia and Heywood Fralin Football Coaching Endowment. The university’s art museum is also named for the couple, following their giſt of 40 pieces of American art.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com 101


Research Institute at Virginia Tech Carilion, where about 30 research teams are working to solve persistent health challenges. Overseeing it all is Friedlander, the founding executive director of the institute as well as vice president for health sciences and technology at Virginia Tech and the senior dean for research at the VTC School of Medicine. A former neuroscience professor at the Baylor College


of Medicine in Houston and the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Friedlander conducts his own research, specifically investigating brain processes related to vision, developmental plasticity and traumatic brain injury. He serves on several boards, including the Children’s National Hospital Research, Education and Innovation Board; the Valleys Innovation Council; and Virginia Catalyst (also known as the Virginia Biosciences Health Research Corp.).


W. Heywood Fralin photo courtesy Virginia Tech


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