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and Drug Administration. So far the leaders in winning FDA approval are ultrasound-based thermal ablation appli- cations that use heat to destroy targeted tissue such as tumors. HistoSonics is developing a system without heat. Its pulse technology destroys tissue, the company says, without generating heat that can damage surrounding tissue. Another approach is to use


focused ultrasound to deliver drugs. That use “is still in its infancy” in terms of development and FDA approval, White says. Immuno- therapy for treating cancer is another application, with research in one area of that field showing that ultrasound treatment actually was stimulating the immune system. White says a researcher in Italy, using ultrasound for palliative care for pancreatic cancer, found that, somehow, leaving part of the tumor in place produced a stronger anti-tumor immune response. Research shows that approach works on about 30 percent of patients, but they don’t yet know which 30 percent, White says. So, the foundation works with every


Cumulative patient treatments with focused ultrasound 1,221 9,735


6,142 18,000 21,444 89,353


Uterine fibroids Prostate diseases Breast tumors Liver tumors Glaucoma Brain Other


The past several years have seen a significant growth in the number of indications under investigation for treatment using focused ultrasound. Reported treatments through


69,825


2017 totaled 215,720. Source: Focused Ultrasound Foundation | State of the Field 2018


A board of heavyweights A key resource for White’s efforts


kind of stakeholder — drug companies, startups, researchers and the rest. “If your whole thing is to accelerate the adoption of the technology, then all of that mat- ters,” she says.


is the expertise of the foundation’s 14-member board. There are plenty of heavyweights. Among them are William Hawkins III, retired chairman and CEO of Medtronic; Stephen Rusckowski, chairman, president and CEO of Quest


The city is working to


becoming an ACT Work Ready Community. This designation will help


prospects and current employers identify skilled workers.


Hampton, in partnership with its community


organizations, has launched several new initiatives geared towards helping businesses fill key positions.


Hampton has dedicated Y. H. Thomas Neighborhood


Center for our community partners to provide skills training for the workforce


DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT | ONE FRANKLIN ST., SUITE 600 | HAMPTON, VA 23669 | 757.727.6237 www.VirginiaBusiness.com VIRGINIA BUSINESS 57


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