search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
mid- and large-scale, permit-ready sites, he says. So, the state is making a major effort to


improve the preparedness of potential sites of all sizes. VEDP is working with the board of GO


Virginia to address the “site-preparedness gap.” The first priority is to classify the common- wealth’s hundreds of sites and then develop programs to help address their deficiencies. The commonwealth uses a five-tier


system, developed by Timmons, to classify readiness through its Virginia Business Ready Sites Program. Achieving Tier IV or Tier V status can


drastically improve a site’s odds of winning a project, says Hines, who played a key role in developing the system. When all other factors are considered


equal, he says, Tier IV sites are 70 percent more likely to be chosen, while Tier V sites are more than 90 percent more likely to score projects. Several developments are improving


their readiness, but Virginia still has a long way to go, Moret says. “We’re definitely headed in the right direction, but I would say we have much more left to do.”


Virginia’s Business Ready Sites Program tier system


Tier I – Raw land with interested seller


Tier II – Site controlled and marketed for development


Tier III – Zoned industrial/ commercial, due diligence complete


Tier IV – Certified as “infrastructure ready”


Tier V – “Shovel Ready” – permits in place


Going after mega-deals Megasites can attract major


investments. In late 2017, Huntsville, Ala., won


a big prize, a $1.6 billion Toyota-Mazda manufacturing facility expected to cre- ate 4,000 jobs at a 1,200-acre megasite. “That was a really big opportunity that Virginia never really got in the running for because, while we did have two or


three sites that could work pretty well, they just weren’t ready enough to be competitive,” says Moret. But while economic developers


dream of snagging projects the size of Toyota-Mazda, most manufacturers need 200 or 300 acres at most. Now armed with infrastructure cer-


tifications, Virginia’s megasites say they are getting more attention. The Southern Virginia Mega Site


at Berry Hill in Pittsylvania is Virginia’s largest at 3,500 acres, the equivalent of about 5.5 square miles. The site didn’t get much traction until the Danville- Pittsylvania Regional Industrial Author- ity agreed to grade a 166-acre lot to prep it for development. After the grading, the property was certified as a Tier IV site. “Up until then, we were just like any other industrial park anywhere in the Southeast,” says Matt Rowe, Pittsylva- nia’s economic development director. “It was a bunch of trees, and we’re just trying to sell them on their hopes and dreams and them having vision.” Now, Rowe says, the park has drawn the attention of more than 10 credible


BUSINESS OWNER: Local loan decisions.


Why should that matter to me? CHESAPEAKE BANK:


You’ll get an answer on your loan more quickly.


And you’re not just evaluated by a computer program based on numbers, we get to know you, and your situation. We can make your loan terms flexible, too, because they’re based on what works for you.


Offices in the Northern Neck, Middle Peninsula, Williamsburg and Richmond 800-434-1181 www.VirginiaBusiness.com chesbank.com Member FDIC VIRGINIA BUSINESS 25


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88