search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
University Profile: Roanoke College


Ellie Hammer offers career advice to Cassidy Drew. “I really like that I’m able to talk to somebody who’s in the business world,” Drew says.


how difficult it could be for a woman to break into her business. When she joined Merrill Lynch, she


was the only female financial adviser in her office. Hammer’s childhood — she describes herself as a tomboy and a daddy’s girl with three brothers — pre- pared her for working with men. “A few of them, I think they’ll tell you I made them be my mentor,” she says. “I kind of bullied them into it.” In addition to Sloman, Hammer is


also mentoring Cassidy Drew, a sopho- more from Atlanta. “I really like that I’m able to talk to somebody who’s in the business world,” Drew says, “just because there’s so much difference between the classroom and the real business world.” She met with Hammer a couple of


Helping two women Ellie Hammer, a 2010 graduate,


has kept up her relationship with 2012 graduate Sara Sloman for more than four years. That connection predates the Maroon Mentor program. Sloman was an intern at the Merrill Lynch office


times last semester, including a mock job interview. Hammer says she wanted to go through that exercise before they got to know each other too well to make it more like a real interview. Drew says the mock interview was


where Hammer works. “It was a very rewarding experience,” Hammer says. She helped Sloman with job shad-


owing years ago. Since then Hammer has assisted Sloman with interviews and other career challenges. Hammer was especially keen to help because she knew


Roanoke College at a glance


STUDENT ENROLLMENT • 1,992 (821 male, 1,171 female)


• 1,519 live on campus, 473 live off campus


STUDENT DEMOGRAPHICS


• States/DC/U.S. territories represented: 43


• International students: 59 (from 31 countries)


• Minority students: 342 (17.2% • Virginia students: 1,049 (53%


PERSISTENCE RATES


• Freshman retention rate (to fall of second year): 83.4%


• 6-year graduation rate: 62.8% 62 JANUARY 2017 ) )


FRESHMAN STATISTICS • SAT Average: 1,089


• Top 10 percent in high school class: 20.9%


• Top 25 percent in high school class: 47%


• Top 50 percent in high school class: 79.1%


STUDENT CHARGES, 2016-2017


• Tuition: $39,720


• Required fees: $1,584 for resident students or $1,334 for nonresident students, + $125 for new student orientation


• Room and board: $12,810


Source: Roanoke College website


very useful. She learned something about how she acts in that situation. “I fidget a lot,” she says. “It’s usually those little things you don’t notice until someone points them out.” Drew’s parents have a consulting


company that finds art for businesses to place in board rooms, reception areas and hotel rooms. Her parents work with sev- eral Fortune 500 companies, Drew says. She likes the variety in that work.


“Every project is something new and dif- ferent,” Drew says, “and I really like that. “ Drew says she’s leaning toward a


career in marketing, perhaps on “the cre- ative side.” (She’s taking a graphic design class.) She likes having a mentor who works in finance because it’s “good to get different perspectives.” Drew’s not sure about the immediate


future of her mentorship because she is applying for a Rotary scholarship, which could mean she’ll spend a semester as an exchange student at the University of Oslo. She’s not completely sure about that marketing career, either. “I still have plenty of time to figure it out,” Drew says.


The mentorship will be even more


valuable in her junior and senior years, Drew says, because she’ll have someone to help connect her with people in the


Photo by Don Petersen


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80