search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Real Estate Wal-Mart also is testing a new


delivery option, paying store employees at some stores a little extra to drop off online orders to customers on their way home from work. “The most expensive part of any online transaction is what’s known as the last mile, and everybody’s trying to solve for that,” Davis says. “With over 4,200 physical locations nationwide, it gives us a pretty good competitive advantage if we can scale that.”


Other retailers are experiment-


ing with new models, too. Best Buy is launching an initiative to allow custom- ers to rent expensive gadgets before they commit to purchase. The biggest buzzword in retail right


now, however, is “experiential.” That’s evident at Virginia’s newest mall, Norfolk Premium Outlets in Norfolk. Opened in late June by Indiana-based Simon Property Group, the mall offers more than discounted clothes from name- brand stores. Located alongside a lake, its amenities include a gazebo and pier,


lakeside dining and a one-mile walking path along the lake. The $75 million, 332,000-square-foot mall, located off Interstate 64 at Northampton Boulevard, was designed as a retail destination, where people and tourists could shop, eat at one of its many restaurants, or relax with a stroll around the lake. “Retailing works when


people gather. The mall has been [a place] where retailing is the draw that brings people in, but that’s no longer the case. You’ve got to find other draws,” says Jeff Tanner, dean of Old Dominion University’s Strome College of Business. “The ability to [showcase] a variety of goods, that’s not going to be sufficient; people can get that from the Internet.” From the smallest retailers to the big-


Tanner


gest mall developers, everyone is focusing on the experience of combining shopping, dining and social media. In 2016, McNa- mee notes, consumer spending at restau- rants outpaced spending at grocery stores for the first time. Grocers are also seeing increased demand for prepared foods. Customers, particularly millennials,


NORTH WALES – 1,466-acre Virginia estate with circa 1776 stone man- or home, two-story Georgian Revival-style stone carriage house, extensive farm and equestrian improvements, a guesthouse, additional residences and a shooting preserve. All improvements have been carefully restored and placed on the Historical Register. MLS#558296 Steve McLean 434.981.1863


are seeking convenience and experiences. “They’re taking pictures of their food plates. They’re spending more money on travel and restaurants than they’ve spent in forever,” says McNamee. That’s the sort of customer Hargett


is hoping to attract to Regency. Its redevelopment includes an


THE CHIMNEYS – Spectacular 273-acre country estate next to Blue Ridge Mountains with the most magnificent views and a 9,000 square foot resi- dence boasting amazing rooms, completely renovated and enlarged. Te farm in excellent condition, fenced, with 2 guest homes, 2 barns, 2 lakes. Visit: www.thechimneysfarm.com MLS#554020 Jim Faulconer 434.981.0076


503 Faulconer Drive | Charlottesville | VA | 22903


office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


92 AUGUST 2017


exterior makeover and the demolition of a parking deck as well as roadway improvements to improve visibility to the mall. Rebkee already has added an office component. He also hopes to acquire the Sears parcel for a possible multifamily residential development that could merge with the surrounding neighborhood and generate more daily traffic, while also revitalizing neighboring businesses. “A lot of people are [already] gather-


ing here,” ranging from food hall patrons to mall walkers, notes Hargett. As expe- riential retail helps grow the mall’s com- munity, he hopes Regency will experience a comeback. Rebkee’s plan for Regency is for it to


“become more of the fabric of the way we live, like [malls] used to be.”


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104