search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
SPECIAL REPORT: 2017 VIRGINIA CFO AWARDS But Gaumer says he’s also looking


for results from investments the college makes. That’s why he spent $50,000 on the creation of a marching band, which is helping the college attract students from throughout the region. Gaumer also supported the acquisi-


tion of a highly successful equestrian program from Virginia Intermont Col- lege in nearby Bristol. (Virginia Inter- mont closed in 2014 because of financial problems.) That program likewise helped


broaden Emory & Henry’s brand and boost its recruiting efforts, Gaumer and Schrum say. If Congress could grant Gaumer


one wish, it would be to increase the Pell Grant program so that more low-income students can be helped. In Southwest Virginia, where the


decline of the coal industry and other economic problems have hurt already struggling families, Gaumer says low- income students need all the help they can get — to gain an education and be job-ready when they graduate.


Dealing with downturn For Dawn Wright-Lawson, CFO


of Henry County Public Schools in economically hard-hit Southern Virginia, finding funds in tight budgets for school improvements is an ongoing challenge. Jared Cotton, Henry County’s school


superintendent, praises his CFO for pro- ducing annual savings of about $1 million for the school system, which serves 17,000 students. “This achievement has allowed for


infrastructure improvements to the divi- sion’s aging schools that would not have otherwise been possible,” Cotton said in his nomination of Wright-Lawson, a CPA. She was the controller of a furniture


components manufacturer in the area before it went out of business. That has been the fate of many furniture and textile manufacturers in the region. Southern Virginia’s economy already


was struggling when Wright-Lawson came to work for the school system in 2008. Then the Great Recession made things worse. In 2010, Henry County had an


Congratulations! The kaléo team congratulates our own


Chris Schools for being named





Virginia’s top CFO in the category of


large private companies by Virginia Business.


Lanzer


unemployment rate of 14.7 percent. By April, it had dropped to 5.2 percent but that rate is still above the state average of 3.8 percent. When Wright-Lawson started her


job, she says, the school system had a $2.5 million capital improvements budget. But that soon evaporated amid overall budget cuts, and ongoing costs haven’t allowed the capital improvements budget to be rebuilt. “Our [overall] budget was reduced $2


million in the first year and $8 million in the next fiscal year,” she says. Some savings have been achieved by


modifying programs that don’t align with the school system’s strategic plans and the attrition of teachers at the top end of the pay scale. Those savings are used to address


unanticipated problems such as a boiler going bad or a leaky roof. The CFO’s most important request


for congressional action focuses on school mandates in the schools. “If they’re going to have these man-


dates, they need to provide enough money to cover them,” she says.


Prepared for hard times Matt Lanzer was out


of a job in 2003 when his previous employer con- solidated its circuit board manufacturing operations in China. Lanzer, a CPA, landed


a position at a startup in


Prince George County, Service Center Metals, which is now a major aluminum extrusion manufacturer. The company’s founders credit him with helping it grow into an enterprise with $133 million in annual revenue and nearly 200 employees. But the path to this point hasn’t been


easy. The company initially had difficulty getting financing. Also, demand fell by more than 40 percent during the Great Recession of 2007-09, forcing the com- pany to lay off some employees. The challenges Lanzer has faced


helped shape his philosophy as a CFO. “My view of the world is that you


should always treat the times as if they are difficult times,” he says. That approach prepares him for downturns, so they’re


72 AUGUST 2017


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104