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ROANOKE/NEW RIVER VALLEY REGION


struggling retailer, affecting hundreds of stores. The Franklin Road Kmart will close by early October, according to the company’s online post. (The Roanoke Times)


Crowds flocked to the popular Salem Fair in strong numbers, despite a few ill-timed rainstorms, generating a total estimated attendance of about 350,000 during the event’s run June 28 through July 9. The 2017 attendance estimates, released after the fair wrapped in July, were on par with last year and ahead of 2015. The Salem Fair doesn’t charge an admission fee — making it one of the largest fairs in the country with a free gate. Organizers predict that this year’s fair will yield about $250,000 in net income for the city via taxes and fees once all receipts are totaled. (The Roanoke Times)


The sole Kmart left in Roanoke is now slated to close. Sears Holdings Corp., which owns Kmart, posted on its website that the company is closing an additional 35 Kmart stores and eight Sears stores by this fall, including the Kmart location at 3533 Franklin Road Southwest. The announcement comes after multiple rounds of closures at the


Supermarket retailer Kroger, whose mid-Atlantic office is located in Roa- noke, has filed a lawsuit against Lidl, a Germany-based grocer, regarding Kroger’s “Private Selection” store brand. In the suit in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia in Rich- mond, Kroger says that Lidl’s “Preferred Selection” store brand is similar in look and design to Kroger’s label. It is seeking an injunction ordering Lidl to immediately stop the use of its Preferred Selection logo and to pay attorney and court fees. Lidl has its U.S. headquar- ters in Arlington County. (Richmond Times-Dispatch)


The Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional Airport saw a 12.3 percent increase in passenger traffic from April to May. Year- to-date growth, from May 2016 to May 2017, was 0.33 percent, with frequent thunderstorms in April preventing a better showing on the year-to-date figures, officials said. The airport moves more than 600,000 passengers a year over four airlines. (News release)


Total Action for Progress has a buyer for the historic Dumas Center for Artistic & Cultural Development in Roanoke, according to a July news release from the nonprofit. TAP has owned the building since around 1990. The nonprofit renovated and opened the


center with the intent of it becoming a major cultural center, but the project struggled from the start. The buyer or terms of the deal were not disclosed, but TAP said it believes the new owners will “keep the rich history of the Dumas alive so that the community will enjoy its presence for years to come.” (The Roanoke Times)


The natural resources program at Virginia Tech has been ranked No. 1 in the country for three years in a row by USA Today College. USA Today College started ranking natural resources and conservation programs in 2015. There are only about 50 colleges across the United States with comprehensive natural resources programs. “Due to exceptional education, affordable price, and high earnings boost, a degree from Virginia Tech is a great choice for any student interested in this field,” the report said. (News release)


PEOPLE


Connie Carmack, Randolph Garrett, Frank Martin and Thomas McKeon have been named to the Roanoke Higher Education Center Foundation Board. In addition, Jeffrey Mohr has joined the center as director of facility services. Mohr holds a bachelor’s degree in facilities management from Almeda University and an associate degree in computer-aided drafting in architecture and engineering from Catonsville Community College. (News release)


W. Heywood Fralin has been appointed chair of the State Council of Higher Education for Vir- ginia. Fralin is the chairman of Medical Facilities of America Inc. and co-chair-


man of Retirement Unlimited Inc., which are both based in Roanoke. He was first appointed to the council in 2013 and had served as vice chair for the prior term. (VirginiaBusiness.com)


Kevin Walker Holt is the new president of the Roanoke Bar Association. Holt is a partner at the Roanoke-based firm Gentry Locke. His practice focuses on commercial, employment, ERISA and intellectual property litigation. Holt earned his bachelor’s degree and law degree from the University of Virginia. (VirginiaBusiness.com)


Jason E. Pauley and Matthew E. Zimmerman have joined the staff of Waldvogel Commercial Properties Inc. in Roanoke. Both men are commercial sales and leasing agents. (News release)


Sheri Winesett has been named the new executive director of the Botetourt County Chamber of Commerce. Wine- sett has worked for Stone Mountain Advisors in Roanoke, providing clients with strategic planning and negotiation services. Before that, she served on the Prince William County Chamber of Commerce executive committee and as president of the Haymarket-Gainesville Business Association. (The Roanoke Times)


Jacinda Jones


Radford University ’17 Major: Media Studies Richmond, Virginia


“ THERE’S A REASON I FEEL CONFIDENT ABOUT MY FUTURE.” THE REASON IS RADFORD


Jacinda Jones has always wanted to be a television producer, and Radford University was the right place to make her dreams a reality. She found instruction and inspiration in a top-notch media studies program and one-on-one attention from her professors. The faculty and career services supported her career plans with advice on fi nding internships and jobs and getting a foot in the door.


Learn more reasons why Radford might be right for you. Radford.edu


20 AUGUST 2017 Radford, VA


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