search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
REGIONAL VIEW eastern virginia


Ferguson to expand headquarters in Newport News by Siona Peterous


F News. The $82.8 million project


will include construction of a seven-story headquarters building at City Center at Oyster Point, a mixed-use development approximately 4 miles from the company’s cur- rent Newport News headquar- ters. The expansion is expected to create 434 jobs and retain 891 positions. Ferguson Enterprises is the largest plumbing whole- saler in the U.S. It also is a major distributor of heating, ventilation and air conditi on- ing (HVAC) equipment, fire protection systems, waterworks and industrial products and services. The company is part of Zug, Switzerland-based Wolseley plc, which was scheduled to change its name to Ferguson on July 31. In explaining the expan-


sion, Ferguson Enterprises said it had reached capacity at its Hampton Roads operations.


FOR THE RECORD


The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation is undergoing a financial transformation to secure its future. Mitchell Reiss, president of the foundation, said it would outsource some of its operations and lay off 71 employees. The plan includes outsourcing its golf operations, retail stores, most of its mainte- nance and facilities operations, and commercial real estate management. The new vendors include Kemper Sports for golf operations, Aramark for prod- ucts and retail management, Brightview for landscaping and WFF for facilities management. (VirginiaBusiness.com)


Isle of Wight County is reducing some of its financial incentives


erguson Enterprises Inc. is expanding its footprint in Newport


spend $25.5 million to build a 1,500-space public parking garage that will connect to Ferguson’s new offices and $700,000 to extend a private road from the garage to the building.


The 52-acre City Center


Ferguson Enterprises’ headquarters operations currently are housed in six buildings in Newport News and one location in Hampton.


The company, which has been based in Virginia for more than 60 years, also said it opted to stay in Newport News because of its strong workforce. In addition to Virginia, Fer- guson Enterprises considered expanding in California, Oregon, Nevada and South Dakota. Hiring for new job open- ings has begun and will con- tinue until 2021. Construction on the 260,000-square-foot headquarters building will begin next year and is expected to be completed in two to three years. City Center offers an


for Keurig Green Mountain Coffee Roasters by 20 percent after the company spent $36 million less than it pledged to on capital investments during a four-year time frame. In 2012, the company and the county entered into an agreement that guaranteed incentive grants for Keurig ranging from discounts on machinery and tools taxes and real estate taxes to $500 grants for each full-time position created. The company said it would spend $180 million on new capital and create 800 full- time jobs by Dec. 31, 2016. The co mpany has created 550 jobs and spent $144 million in capital investments. (Daily Press)


In May, Gov. Terry McAuliffe celebrated the opening of Virginia’s newest asset in drone


10 AUGUST 2017


urban feel and easy access to amenities like restaurants and shops, which will help Ferguson attract talent, says Florence Kingston, director of Newport News’ development department. “One of our other selling points in terms of value of this location was the convenience to the corporate headquarters locations,” and quick interstate access, she says.


The company is eli-


gible for $4.1 million in state incentives and $11.5 million in local incentives, includ- ing grants, tax credits and infrastructure contributions. Newport News also plans to


technology research — a runway for unmanned aircraft — and then experienced the future of aviation firsthand by flying in a plane that can be piloted from the ground. McAuliffe visited NASA Wallops Flight Facility for a ribbon-cutting ceremony on the runway, a $5.8 million state- funded project officially known as the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems (MARS UAS) Airfield. “This new facility at Wallops provides government and commercial users with a runway under restricted airspace on a secure federal facility — discreet- ness that is of high interest for research and development,” Virginia Transportation Secretary Aubrey Layne said. (News release)


development includes res- taurants, apartments and a Marriott hotel, which has a conference center owned by the Newport News Economic Development Authority. Access to the Marriott will allow Ferguson to easily bring in people for training, meet- ings, sales conferences and other events, says Carol Mere- dith, Newport News’ assistant director of development. “They wanted to be


somewhere that would be a statement,” Meredith says. The company also sought a site that offered the convenience of “being able to get out of your office to grab a coffee, or work out or do plenty of other things and never have to get into one’s car again until the end of the day.”


The Shirley T. Holland Intermo- dal Park in Isle of Wight County is under consideration for the location of a 1-million-square- foot facility that could bring up to 1,000 jobs to the area, accord- ing to Economic Development Director Tom Elder. The county is competing against Suffolk, which has four sites under con- sideration for the same project. Additionally, seven other pos- sible clients have either visited the 82-acre site in the park or have obtained information from the developer. (Daily Press)


PEOPLE


John Dunn has been promoted to chief financial officer at ADS. Dunn started working for the Virginia Beach defense contrac- tor in 2010 as the corporate


controller before he became vice president of finance in 2013. (Inside Business)


James City County Supervisor Michael Hipple has been named chairman of the Hampton Roads Transportation Accountability Commission. Hipple will take over for Virginia Beach Mayor William D. Sessoms Jr., who reached the end of his two-year term. Hipple was vice chairman. (The Virginia Gazette)


Paul Julius, a former Morgan Stanley executive, has been named CFO and executive director at Norfolk-based law firm Vandeventer Black LLP. Julius was director of finance at Proskauer Rose LLP in the New York City area. (VirginiaBusiness. com)


Photo courtesy Ferguson Enterprises Inc.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104