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VOLUME 32 - NUMBER 9 Product Preview: SMTAI


JTAG debuts several new hardware products for PCB testing and in-system pro- gramming. Product Preview begins on…


Page 76


UR Supplies Cobots to Scott Fetzer


THE GLOBAL HI-TECH ELECTRONICS PUBLICATION September, 2017


Hanwha Techwin Establishes SMT “Basecamp” in California


By Michael Skinner, Associate Editor


Cypress, CA — One of the largest conglomerates in South Korea, Han- wha Group has a long history of building everything from security cameras to jet engines and self-pro- pelled howitzers. The company now


plans to channel this expertise into the North American SMT market. Following the recent acquisition


of Samsung Techwin, Hanwha Tech- win Automation Americas has estab- lished a center of excellence in Cy- press, California. The 16,000 ft2 (1,486m2) facility was christened on


July 26, 2017, and boasts four state- of-the-art, functional SMT produc- tion lines, a full inventory of spare parts, space for feeder calibration and rework, and a stock of factory- certified preowned SMT machines, as well as brand-new equipment. Hanwha CEO Allen Choi gave a


toast to the new facility, calling it a “basecamp” for the company. Analo- gous to mountain climbing, Hanwha has cemented the foundation of a manufacturing technology platform that carries with it decades of SMT experience, promising to save its North American customers the trou- ble of starting any production


Continued on page 6


Universal Robots installs a mobile fleet of collaborative ro- bots for Scott Fetzer Electrical Group. EMS section begins on…


Page 20 This Month's Focus: PCB and Automation


Executives from Hanwha, PEMTRON and ESE cut a ceremonial rib- bon in front of Hanwha’s new facility in Cypress, California.


World’s First Biocompatible Ion Current Battery


KIC develops smart oven tech - nology; SEHO aids Siemens in the production of industrial PCs; Creative Electron uncov- ers hidden BGA faults with X- ray inspection. Special Fea- tures begin on…


Page 62


College Park, MD —Engineers at the University of Maryland have invent- ed an entirely new kind of battery. It is biocompatible, because it produces the same kind of electrical energy that the body uses. In ordinary batteries the elec-


trical energy, or current, is delivered in the form of moving electrons. This flow of electrons out of the battery is generated by moving positive ions from one end to the other of the bat- tery. This new device does the oppo-


site. It moves electrons around in the device to deliver energy as a flow of ions out. Through ion currents, elec- tricity is generated in the human body and in all living things. This is the first time that an ionic current- generating battery has been created by humans. “My intention is for ionic sys-


tems to interface with human sys- tems,” says Liangbing Hu, the head of the group that developed the bat- tery. Hu is a professor of materials science at the University of Mary- land, College Park. He is also a mem- ber of the University of Maryland Energy Research Center and a prin- cipal investigator of the Nanostruc- tures for Electrical Energy Storage Energy Frontier Research Center, sponsored by the Department of En- ergy, which funded the study. “I came up with the reverse de- sign of a battery. In a typical battery,


Continued on page 8


Osaka, Japan — Researchers from Osaka University, Italy and the Netherlands have shown that nanowire resonators can be used to further miniaturize energy-efficient electronics. A major path to this miniaturization has been the devel- opment of nano-size resonators, which convert small levels of electri- cal power into mechanical oscilla- tions at high frequencies. The new systems, built around


Nanowire Resonators Miniaturize Electronics


freestanding nanowires, are simple, scalable and open the possibility of creating NEMS that have fast switching and are powered by a DC power source. “Nano-electromechanical res-


onators are used in all sorts of modern technology. You may not see them, but they can be found in robotics, medical tools and environmental sensors,” says Osaka University professor Hidezaku Tanaka. Earlier this year, Tanaka and


his research team created a free- standing nanowire that could reduce the power demands of nano-res- onators by a factor of 100. “Transi- tion metals undergo an insulator-to- metal transition. We made free- standing nanowires made of vanadi-


um dioxide (VO2) that had high per- formance at low power.” The phase transition can occur


by injecting electrical power into VO2 Continued on page 8


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