search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Next Issue Focus:


Assembly and Inspection


Send News Releases for:


SMTAI, IMAPS productronica, The ASSEMBLY Show


VOLUME 36 - NUMBER 9 Product Preview:


The Battery Show


FlexLink provides heavy-duty product handling during


manufacturing and testing. Product previews begin on... Page 70


EM Services September, 2021


Throttled: EV Infrastructure Needs Upgrade


PHOENIXVILLE, PA — Over the last year, the number of elec- tric cars on roads around the world surpassed 10 million. Bat- tery powered versions account for about two-thirds of the total. About half of all electric cars


are in China, though Europe saw a significant increase during 2020 to reach a total of 3.2 million. The problem is lagging in-


frastructure expansion for all types of electric/hybrid vehicles on the market today, which in- clude plug-in hybrid EVs, hydro-


gen powered fuel cell EVs in ad- dition to those that rely solely on batteries. This also includes the creeping pace of electrification for heavy freight trucks, of which there were fewer than 50 on the roads in 2020.


Stunted Growth Producing EV batteries at


scale has led to a sharp decrease in cost over the last 10 years. This has lowered the price of EVs overall, as the battery is typical- ly one of the most expensive


parts of the vehicle. However, in many countries


around the world there is a dis- tinct lack of EV charging stations. This makes public charging diffi- cult or impossible for some and reduces demand as consumers turn to conventional options for vehicles, or forego them entirely in tightly packed urban areas. Most of the developed


world’s countries have some sort of government-led initiative in which electric vehicles are en- couraged as part of a larger envi- ronmental conservation plan. In many of those countries, 2050 is a target by which they hope to meet reduced vehicle emissions goals. To that end, governments


Nordson Test & Inspection covers the critical process of testing auto batteries. EMS section begins on...


Page 18 EM Products


Workers at EV maker Rivian assemble one of the company’s first units.


CyberOptics showcases high- precision inspection and metrology solutions. EM products begin on...


Page 26 This Month’s Focus: Automation Energy Assurance high-


lights key areas of growth for batteries: miniaturiza- tion, charging speed, and


U.S. production capacity... Page 56


PCB and


Asia Sees its First CCS Conformance Test Lab


GYEONGSANGNAM-DO, SOUTH KOREA — Korea Elec- trotechnology Research Institute (KERI), an internationally ac- credited testing and certification agency for electric power equip- ment, was recognized by the Charging Interface Initiative (CharIN) as a “CCS conformance test laboratory.” The recognition marks Asia’s first CCS confor- mance test lab. CharIN is a global associa-


tion dedicated to promoting inter- operability based on the combined charging system (CCS) as the global standard for charging sys- tems. The group also develops and establishes conformance test-


ing and certification programs. Currently, more than 200 of


the world’s leading EV manufac- turers such as Hyundai, KiA, BMW, Volkswagen, and GM serve as core members of CharIN. By selecting and applying


the charging connector and inlet standard, physical interoperabil- ity has been achieved already. However, due to inconsistent in- terpretation of requirements, in- teroperability issues remain, such as inability to charge, charging that stops suddenly, connectors locking after charg- ing, and others. As the EV market continues


Continued on page 8


are actively promoting the devel- opment and sales of EVs and re- lated charging infrastructure. For example, the U.S. invested


Continued on page 6


Splitting MMW Beams for Reliable


5G Networks SAN DIEGO, CA — Consumers of today’s 5G cell phones may have experienced one of the fol- lowing tradeoffs: impressive download speeds with extremely limited and spotty coverage, or widespread and reliable coverage with speeds that aren’t much faster than today’s 4G networks. A new technology developed


by electrical engineers at the Uni- versity of California San Diego combines the best of both worlds and could enable 5G connectivity is both ultra-fast and reliable. Today’s high band 5G sys-


tems communicate data by send- ing one laser-like millimeter wave (MMW) beam between a base station and a receiver. The problem is if something or some-


Continued on page 8


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100