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31 ASH DIEBACK


Ash dieback is currently threatening to severely affect or kill over 90 % of ash trees. With the ash tree being the third most common trees in the UK after oak and birch, the effect could be devastating particularly in Devon’s wooded landscapes.


This disease, also known as Chalara, is caused by a fungus which affects the vascular system of ash trees, inhibiting the tree’s ability to draw nutrients up into its upper branches. The disease was first recorded in the UK in 2012 having been inadvertently imported on ash saplings.


How to identify Chalara? • Black/browning leaf, often spreading down the stem • Small blackened hanging branches • Lesions, spots and cankers appear on the bark • Crown dieback


If you suspect you have an case of Ash dieback on your property visit www.devonashdieback.org.uk and follow the advice on the Infected trees : Do’s and don’ts.


WILDLIFE & NATURE EVENTS


WEEKENDS DEER PARK DISCOVERY TRAIL Dartington Deer Park A unique experience helping to feed the deer herd at Dartington. Learn about the deer’s ecology in close proximity of these magnificent animals and hear how they fit into the con- servation model at Dartington. Book online. Dartington.org


23 MARCH KINGSBRIDGE NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY MEETING West Charleton village hall 7.30pm Management of Devon Wildlife Trust Reserves


7 APRIL AND 5 MAY VOLUNTEER EVERY TUESDAY IN SHARPHAM’S GARDENs Learn about gardening, horticulture and nature conservation by joining these weekly volunteer days. 9am – 4pm. Contact volunteer@ sharphamtrust.org


11 APRIL SLAPTON SANDS BEACH CLEAN Join the Field Centre between 10am – 12noon to help clean up Slapton Sands. Meet in middle car park. No booking required. Mcsuk.org


Catkins


Catkins are popping up everywhere and are easy to spot on the otherwise bare branches of trees before the leaves open.


● Catkins vary in size and colour and grow on many different trees in the UK – Hazel, alder, silver birch, oak and willow.


●They are long, slim flowers which often have no petals.


● Catkins allow trees to reproduce releasing pollen into the wind in February/March.


● Some trees have male flowers on one tree and female flowers on another tree. Others, such as alder and hazel have male and


female flowers on the same tree.


Hazel


17 APRIL SPRING MIGRANTS WITH MIKE LANGMAN Berry Head This morning walk corresponds with the busy spring migration period of the year. 9.30am – 11.30am. countryside-trust.org.uk


25 APRIL NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP Berry Head A great opportunity to learn how to take great digital wildlife images with a award winning photographer, Phil Hemsley. countryside-trust. org.uk 10am – 4pm countryside-trust.org.uk


2 MAY DAWN CHORUS Berry Head Join local bird expert Mike Langman for a morn- ing of birdsong to celebrate International Dawn Chorus Day. 5.30 – 8.30am. countryside-trust. org.uk


3 MAY Willow


Alder tree rounded female catkins and the longer, thinner male catkins


DUSK CHORUS WALK Sharpham Trust Come and enjoy the dusk chorus with local bird expert Mike Langman.Tel: 01803 732542. 6.30 – 9pm. www.sharphamtrust.org


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