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THE FUTURE OF POLICING


A publication from


Digital Policing.Building 21st century systems


Police forces in the UK are moving at pace towards the full digital transformation of their services. Digital transformation is never an easy process for any organisation that has legacy assets and certain ways of doing things. It requires a willing- ness to change, patience, respect and a deep understanding of complexity and risk. It also demands clear goals, leadership and skills in complex project management, coupled with real expertise in the technologies that are set to revolutionise policing


as we enter an era where data reigns supreme. Policing has made great strides since the early days of computerisa- tion in the 1970s and 80s; information held in systems has enhanced the ability of forces to analyse crime data, and make investigatory and decision- making leaps that would have not been possible in the distant past. However, that advancement is at risk of stalling: large systems have grown incongruously and in many cases re- quire inelegant, manual workarounds,


keeping officers away from the front- line, where they are most required. Even as technology itself has flour- ished, differentiated and competing systems used by police keep informa- tion locked away, acting as a barrier to the gleaming prize of digital trans- formation, which is for information to be available and used meaningfully in real time, saving labour, cost and even lives. Segregated, siloed processes do not reflect how policing wants to be perceived in the data age: of a seam- less public service which is effective,


trustworthy and responds to changing consumer needs. Surfacing police data in a way that it can be accessed ‘live’ and in a rel- evant and useable format will unlock untold benefits to policing. Critically, it will allow police to move from a reactive to proactive delivery model. Real-time data analysis will usher in a new era of responsive, flexible resource planning, predictive policing will become a reality and the ability to digitally engage communities – where vast sources of online data





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