search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
FUNDRAISING – Planning


The PTA year planner September


TO DO: ● Review last year’s successes to establish which events go on the shortlist for this year. ● Host a welcome event for new parents. ● Send out written notice (at least 21 days before) of your AGM. ● Collect contact details from parents for the year ahead, ensuring you’re complying with GDPR. ● Agree dates for your main events and circulate ‘save-the-date’ notifi cations. EVENTS: It’s Roald Dahl Day on 13 September and it’s the perfect excuse to celebrate 55 years since Charlie and the Chocolate Factory was published. British Food Fortnight (21 September to 6 October) offers a chance to host a dining experience, and Macmillan’s World’s Biggest Coffee Morning falls on 27 September this year.


March


TO DO: ● Start planning leavers’ events and gifts, allowing plenty of time to gather photos and quotes from staff and students. ● Hold an afternoon tea or pamper and shopping evening to treat mums, grandmas and female carers in the run-up to Mother’s Day. ● Host a car boot sale or second-hand ‘swishing’ evening to take advantage of spring clear-outs. EVENTS: Dress up for World Book Day (5 March) and raise money while getting active as part of Comic Relief’s Sport Relief on 9-13 March.


October


TO DO: ● If you’re planning a Christmas card fundraiser, decide how children’s artwork will be produced. ● Once your PTA committee is established, meet with your head to discuss this year’s wish list. ● Set up a passive income scheme, such as a 100 club or a shopping affi liate programme. EVENTS: A great month for foodie events, not only does it contain National Curry Week (7-13 October) and National Baking Week (14-20 October), it’s also World Food Day on 16 October. Ideas include a curry and quiz night, or a ‘bake- off’ event.


April


TO DO: ● Plan a recruitment drive to fi ll the shoes of anyone who might be stepping down in the next six months. Identify any skills gaps and promote vacancies, getting new volunteers to shadow more experienced committee members. ● Consider wet-weather and hot- weather contingency plans for any outdoor events you’re running. ● Speak to teachers to discuss plans for involving pupils in the summer fair. EVENTS:


Organise a poetry or short-story competition for Shakespeare Day (23 April) or a fl ower-growing contest for National Gardening Week (27 April to 3 May). Easter weekend is 10-13 April this year. Earth Day (22 April) offers the perfect opportunity for holding an eco-friendly event.


November


TO DO: ● 29 November is Black Friday, so promote your online shopping fundraising schemes to parents to benefi t from their purchases. ● Consult our Christmas fair countdown to check you’re on track (pta.co.uk/fairs). ● End-of-term discos are always popular – send home permission forms and requests for payment. EVENTS: Will your PTA be hosting fi rework celebrations for Guy Fawkes Night on 5 November? BBC Children in Need will also fall this month.


May


TO DO: ● If the school is running a taster session for children joining in September, make sure someone from your PTA attends to answer any questions. Provide fl yers outlining what you do and how new parents can get involved. ● If you haven’t already, start a ‘freeze-pop Fridays’ fundraiser. ● Start recruiting volunteers for your summer fair. EVENTS: Hold a ‘street party’ or celebratory picnic in the run up to the VE Day 75th anniversary on 8 May. Get pupils active with Living Streets’ Walk


to School Week (18-22 May).


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60