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14 RETAIL REPORTS


Although counterfeiting is not new, the sale of ‘fake’ goods is increasing, which is unsurprising given the digital age in which we live in, where image is everything. With a growing desire


for high-end goods at a fraction of the price, from clothing to electrical goods and everything in between, differentiating between what is real and what is fake is becoming much harder. According to T he Organisation for Economic Co - o p er a ti o n a nd Development (OECD), nearly £76bn worth of imported goods are counterfeit or pirate, with the UK loosing billions each year due to the increasing counterfeit market. The UK Card Association


has estimated the value of online card spending to be around £154bn a year, which makes the loss due to fake goods just shy of half of the UK’s total online card spending. The impact of counterfeit


goods are not only damaging to online sales, but to brand reputation and consumer perceptions. Incopro has reported that 65 percent of consumers claimed that they are likely to lose their trust in the original product if it is


relatively easy to buy fake versions. To illustrate the state of the counterfeit market, British business and consumer marketplace, OnBuy.com, sought to understand consumers’ perceptions surrounding counterfeit goods, pulling highlights from Incopro’s report ‘Counterfeit products are endemic – and it is damaging brand value’. Interestingly, 25 percent of


UK consumers have admitted to knowingly buying at least one counterfeit product in the last 12 months. According to the report, a mere 1 in 5 have reported an online marketplace after receiving fake goods which they believed to be genuine. OnBuy can reveal that illicit


goods have a detrimental impact on a brand’s reputation, with 35 percent of consumers stating they would be ‘less likely to buy the brand’s products from online marketplaces’, and a further 34 percent indicating they would be ‘less likely to buy the goods directly from the brand website’. More worryingly, however,


5 percent suggested they would ‘actively seek out the counterfeit goods online’ if they knew it was relatively easy to buy fake products from a brand. Meanwhile


22 percent of consumers stated that knowing there was a chance the goods they were purchasing could be counterfeit would not influence their decision to buy.


It’s clear the world


of counterfeit goods is expanding, and those who sell fake products online are sophisticated and savvy and know how to make the distinction between real and fake incredibly hard for the customer to spot. Despite this, OnBuy discovered that a whopping 92 percent of consumers actively look for warning signs when online shopping. OnBuy has therefore highlighted the top ‘warning signs’ from the report which indicate if a product is fake, and provided some tips to help check the authenticity: Unsurprisingly, a massive


69 percent of UK consumers stated that price was the largest indicator that a product could potentially be counterfeit. Tip: If a deal seems too


good to be true, it usually is. Large discounts which are more than 50 percent of the RRP usually mean the product is fake. Go directly to the brand’s website and look at any current sales or discounts – this is usually a


MARKET TRADER, APRIL 12 - 25, 2019 A quarter of Brits bought fakes in 2018


Common sense is often a key factor in determining what is genuine and what is pretending to be


good indicator whether the price offering is the real deal. Just under half of respondents claimed that both the website and customer reviews flag up the risk that the goods they are purchasing online might not be authentic. Tip: Always check for fake websites; look for https:// at the beginning of a URL, and the ‘padlock’ which indicates the site itself is secure and trusted by Google. Reading


through reviews is always a good indication if a site, its seller and goods are genuine. Trust your instincts. A further 41 percent indicated that the country of the online seller is also a warning sign whilst shopping with an online marketplace. Tip: There should always


be contact details for a seller and/or manufacturer; if there aren’t any contact details listed it is highly likely that the goods are fake.


Almost 40 percent of consumers said the ‘imagery’ on a website and the quality of the product descriptions has led them to question the validity of online products. Tip: Checking for spelling


mistakes, grammar and flawed details may seem obvious but it can be easily overlooked. A quick Google of the product can highlight what should and shouldn’t be there and whether the images are standardised.


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Neath signs up to fight fakes with the Real Deal


Page 10


More protection for Christmas market


Bath’s Christmas market will this year employ “robust” defences to prevent extremists from using vehicles as weapons when the event expands to a new location. Although no specific threat


BRAY ASSOCIATES


WE CAN OFFER 33 TRADING DAYS A WEEK


SERVING THE NATION’S TRADERS SINCE 1922 www.market-trader.co.uk AUGUST 31 - SEPTEMBER 13, 2018


01895 639912 No. 4934


INSIDE... Page 3


70p


to the city has been identified, Visit Bath, which organises the market, wants to place 24 chalets and two food stalls along the city’s Milsom Street for 18 days this winter, and again in 2019, and only ambulances, police cars and fire engines will be allowed access. The move has been prompted by major renovation works, some of which are already underway, in Abbey Churchyard, Kingston Parade and around Bath Abbey, as well as York Street and Swallow Street, which mean some stallholders will be displaced. The planning application submitted to Bath and North East Somerset Council states that: “Whilst the Christmas market will have an obvious visual impact on this part of Bath city centre, this will be temporary and, given its location at the heart of the city’s retail area, appropriate to the festive season. “Visit Bath is committed


Neath signs up to fight fakes with the Real Deal


Page 10


to planning and operating a high-quality event in the city which continues to be a market leader of British Christmas Markets and to maintain the benchmark for which others aim to aspire to. “By locating chalets in Milsom Street it will allow us to: • Further enhance visitor and resident experience


More protection for Christmas market


Bath’s Christmas market will this year employ “robust” defences to prevent extremists from using vehicles as weapons when the event expands to a new location. Although no specific threat


to the city has been identified, Visit Bath, which organises the market, wants to place 24 chalets and two food stalls along the city’s Milsom Street for 18 days this winter, and again in 2019, and only ambulances, police cars and fire engines will be allowed access. The move has been prompted by major renovation works, some of which are already underway, in Abbey Churchyard, Kingston Parade and around Bath Abbey, as well as York Street and Swallow Street, which mean some stallholders will be displaced. The planning application submitted to Bath and North East Somerset Council states that: “Whilst the Christmas market will have an obvious visual impact on this part of Bath city centre, this will be temporary and, given its location at the heart of the city’s retail area, appropriate to the festive season. “Visit Bath is committed


to planning and operating a high-quality event in the city which continues to be a market leader of British Christmas Markets and to maintain the benchmark for which others aim to aspire to. “By locating chalets in Milsom Street it will allow us to: • Further enhance visitor and resident experience


of the event by extending the footprint and easing congestion;


• Support the Bath Abbey Footprint project;


• Support the Roman Baths Archway Project;


• Make way for essential road repairs;


• Further engage with the independent businesses throughout the city.”


Increased risk


The 2018 Bath Christmas Market will run from Thursday November 22 to Sunday December 9, and confirmation of the dates coincided with the publication of the results of a survey commissioned to assess the impact of last year’s festive market on the city’s economy The survey revealed an


estimated spend of £29.4m outside of the market itself, the largest amount ever seen in the event’s 17 year history, and a 40 percent increase on 2016. The survey also showed that


an estimated 409,000 people visited the market and an estimated £10.7m was spent within the market, supporting over 200 stallholders, 87 percent of which are from Bath and the South West. Charities in Bath also benefitted from the 2017 Christmas Market, with £12,000 being distributed to various local causes. With this success, however,


comes increased risk, one of the most deadly being the potential use of vehicles as weapons, a possibility made real when a truck was driven into a Christmas market in Berlin in 2016.


Part of the festive market in Bath (Photo: Bath Tourism) The Visit Bath plan states


that: “As one of the South West’s largest open public access events, Bath Christmas market will be establishing a robust vehicle access plan. “As the market footprint develops and expands into new areas of the city, considerations will be made to all areas of vulnerability. “It is recognized that a vehicle offers a convenient delivery mechanism for a large explosive device as well as the vehicle itself being used as a weapon.” Physical barriers will be put


in place, and a city-wide radio link will share intelligence about “anything which may pose as a potential threat or issue elsewhere in the city”. Bath and North East Somerset Council leader, Tim Warren, reiterated the message from last year when defences were installed, that there is “no known threat” to the city and the measures are purely precautionary.


Budding traders set out stalls in Stratford


Allowing time to set up


and then remove the chalets, Milsom Street will be closed to normal traffic from November 19 until December 10. The chalets wi l l be


positioned so the pavements, business doorways and window displays are clear, and there will be sufficient space for emergency vehicles to gain access. Stallholders will be required


to offer discounts at certain times to residents who have Discovery Cards, and they will be expected to decorate their chalets to a high standard. Visit Bath has said it will


work to “maintain a strong working relationship with local businesses and residents” throughout the event. When the application was submitted Visit Bath was due to consult with various local residents and retailers associations and the council’s highways team, and there will be further consultation with other key stakeholders,


as well as a series of drop-in events. As in previous years the


market will feature a variety of entertainment, including choirs, school groups, local theatrical schools, brass bands and other performances in keeping with the festive nature of the event. Visit Bath will also be


required to apply for premises licences and to submit street trading and event applications before the council can give the market the go ahead.


Page 14


Are we all ready for the move Back to School?


ASSOCIATES BRAY


WE CAN OFFER 33 TRADING DAYS A WEEK


Contact: Office– 01895 639912 Sam – 07737 630843 Les – 07971 738239


BRAY ASSOCIATES


A number of UK Christmas markets (including Manchester, pictured above) have introduced robust defences in the wake of recent terrorist attacks


01895 639912 Email: email@bray-associates.co.uk www.bray-associates.co.uk


of the event by extending the footprint and easing congestion;


• Support the Bath Abbey Footprint project;


• Support the Roman Baths Archway Project;


• Make way for essential road repairs;


• Further engage with the independent businesses throughout the city.”


Increased risk


The 2018 Bath Christmas Market will run from Thursday November 22 to Sunday December 9, and confirmation of the dates coincided with the publication of the results of a survey commissioned to assess the impact of last year’s festive market on the city’s economy The survey revealed an


estimated spend of £29.4m outside of the market itself, the largest amount ever seen in the event’s 17 year history, and a 40 percent increase on 2016. The survey also showed that


an estimated 409,000 people visited the market and an estimated £10.7m was spent within the market, supporting over 200 stallholders, 87 percent of which are from Bath and the South West. Charities in Bath also benefitted from the 2017 Christmas Market, with £12,000 being distributed to various local causes. With this success, however,


comes increased risk, one of the most deadly being the potential use of vehicles as weapons, a possibility made real when a truck was driven into a Christmas market in Berlin in 2016.


Part of the festive market in Bath (Photo: Bath Tourism) The Visit Bath plan states


that: “As one of the South West’s largest open public access events, Bath Christmas market will be establishing a robust vehicle access plan. “As the market footprint develops and expands into new areas of the city, considerations will be made to all areas of vulnerability. “It is recognized that a vehicle offers a convenient delivery mechanism for a large explosive device as well as the vehicle itself being used as a weapon.” Physical barriers will be put


in place, and a city-wide radio link will share intelligence about “anything which may pose as a potential threat or issue elsewhere in the city”. Bath and North East Somerset Council leader, Tim Warren, reiterated the message from last year when defences were installed, that there is “no known threat” to the city and the measures are purely precautionary.


Budding traders set out stalls in Stratford


Allowing time to set up


and then remove the chalets, Milsom Street will be closed to normal traffic from November 19 until December 10. The chalets wi l l be


positioned so the pavements, business doorways and window displays are clear, and there will be sufficient space for emergency vehicles to gain access. Stallholders will be required


to offer discounts at certain times to residents who have Discovery Cards, and they will be expected to decorate their chalets to a high standard. Visit Bath has said it will


work to “maintain a strong working relationship with local businesses and residents” throughout the event. When the application was submitted Visit Bath was due to consult with various local residents and retailers associations and the council’s highways team, and there will be further consultation with other key stakeholders,


as well as a series of drop-in events. As in previous years the


market will feature a variety of entertainment, including choirs, school groups, local theatrical schools, brass bands and other performances in keeping with the festive nature of the event. Visit Bath will also be


required to apply for premises licences and to submit street trading and event applications before the council can give the market the go ahead.


Page 14


Are we all ready for the move Back to School?


ASSOCIATES BRAY


WE CAN OFFER 33 TRADING DAYS A WEEK


Contact: Office– 01895 639912 Sam – 07737 630843 Les – 07971 738239


BRAY ASSOCIATES


A number of UK Christmas markets (including Manchester, pictured above) have introduced robust defences in the wake of recent terrorist attacks


01895 639912 Email: email@bray-associates.co.uk www.bray-associates.co.uk


M23287


M23287


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