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By Lucy Hubery funandglitter.co.uk


TPTAOP BUYS gazeboshop.co.uk


Need some ideas for school resources you can buy using PTA funds? Here’s what other PTAs have purchased…


1 Temporary tattoos


Cheap to buy and easy to apply, tattoos are a popular addition to school summer fairs, making an easy profi t with little effort. Most take just a few seconds to apply using a wet sponge, and if you buy them in bulk then you can get them for as little as 4p. To add a festival feel to your summer fair why not set up a glitter tattoo stall? You’ll need to purchase a kit (which comes with stencils, cosmetic glitter, glue and brushes) but it can be used at more than one event, and customers will usually be happy to pay a bit more for a super-sparkly glitter tattoo. Surplus stock of tattoos and glitters can be stored for use at future PTA events.


WHERE TO BUY funandglitter.co.uk; risuswholesale.co.uk; davidssales.co.uk


54 SUMMER 2019 pta.co.uk 2 Gazebos


There’s no accounting for the great British weather when it comes to summer fair planning, so it’s a good idea to have your own gazebos. Not only do they provide protection against the sun, the also offer shelter from wind and rain. When purchasing a gazebo for your school, make sure that it is waterproof, UV-stable and fl ame retardant. They come in all sorts of sizes and types, so consider what would be best for your school (some will require considerable manpower to erect and dismantle). Most pack down to a manageable size for storage, and can be used at other outdoor events, as well as being turned into a Santa’s grotto at the Christmas fair.


WHERE TO BUY gazeboshop.co.uk; tfhgazebos.co.uk


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