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MANAGING YOUR PTA – Successful succession planning


ticket printers, or wholesalers such as Booker (plus membership card) l Licences (e.g. lottery licence for raffles) l Guarantees for PTA-owned equipment l Equipment servicing/testing details (electrical items need to undergo an annual PAT test)


GDPR Bear in mind that any contact details are subject to GDPR and information may need to be destroyed. This is dependent on the terms given when the information was collected. You’ll need to delete details in the timeframe stated when the information was taken, meaning the next committee may need to regain consent. Provide them with the form you used last time with a note on how and when you distributed this. Remember that GDPR does not apply in the same way to generic business contact details or details available in the public domain. Before committee members leave


their roles they will need to delete any data they hold, including in personal email accounts and on their own computer.


Calendar Provide a calendar of school activities that the PTA usually gets involved with over the year. This might include serving refreshments at the Christmas carol concert or giving a talk at the new starters’ evening in the summer term. Note any expiry or renewal dates


for things such as your annual lottery licence, insurance or when your annual return needs to be filed with the Charity Commission (if applicable). When do you hold committee meetings and your AGM – and how far in advance do you need to give notice?


Accounting It is best practice to have two authorised signatories on cheques and direct debits, so make sure everyone knows who yours are. An independent annual audit should also be carried out and annual accounts kept for a minimum of six years. Are there any financial commitments, such as maintenance contracts, that need to be flagged up?


Can you stay on if your child has left?


If your child is leaving the school,


you don’t necessarily have to leave, too. Generally, a PTA will only have


parents or teachers on the association, whereas a PTFA or PFA can have grandparents and friends of the school. Check your constitution to see who can and cannot be a committee member.


Nice-to-have information A good starting point for a handover pack is to consider what sort of handover you received when you joined the committee. What information did you get? Which bits of key information do you wish you had been given? Your notes will be invaluable for future members trying to get to grips with what has been done before and the lessons you’ve learnt along the way. The following would be helpful:


l Detailed event information – from who DJs at discos and how much they charge, to where you source burgers for the summer fair, and any licensing requirements l Ongoing fundraising initiatives, e.g. recycling schemes, 100 club, shopping affiliate schemes l Templates and letters, including sign-in sheets for school discos and raffle donation request letters l Risk assessments – it’s easier to review and amend these each year than start them from scratch l Knowledge capsules/feedback documents from events l Details of raffle and auction prize donors and donations as well as sponsors and sponsorship l ‘About our PTA’ letters and flyers l Communication – who’s responsible for providing content for the school newsletter, sending letters to parents and updating the PTA website and social media pages? By passing on the knowledge and


experience you have acquired in your time on the PTA, you can step away, confident that you are leaving the PTA in safe hands.


End-of-year planning


You don’t want the PTA to lose momentum or organisation through the handover process, so ensure everything’s ship shape and ready for the new school year. This includes:


PROMOTING YOUR SUCCESSES Take advantage of any captive audiences at summer events and share the success of the year and the importance of volunteers. Don’t limit this just to the school – send press releases to local newspapers and share your success via social media, so potential supporters will see it. Hold an end-of-year event to thank supporters and celebrate your achievements – see p42 for inspiration.


REPLENISHING MANPOWER This will tie into your drive for new committee members, so ensure people are aware of the opportunities the PTA offers and the benefits it gives. Be sure to thank all the volunteers who help out at your summer fair so it’s more likely they’ll help out in future.


TAKE AN INVENTORY OF GOODS If it’s not been done for a while, make a thorough inventory of the contents of your PTA shed, including the number of leftover stall prizes, which face- painting colours need replenishing, and best before dates on consumables.


SET NEW GOALS Put goals in place now so that the next PTA has an idea of what to work towards. If you’re part way through a fundraising drive for a specific item, detail how far you’ve come and how much more work there is to do to ensure none of your progress is lost.


GET SET FOR AUTUMN If there’s anything that needs doing for next year, such as welcome packs and AGM planning, get on it now. For anything that will be implemented now but carried through for the next committee, such as Christmas projects with external suppliers, set them up and keep the relevant information and documents to pass on.


pta.co.uk SUMMER 2019 25


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