search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
LIVE 24-SEVEN


Absolutely. There was a guy I met with James (Kent, director) whose father was one of the colonels who was helping to rebuild Germany in the aftermath of the war and the son of the guy I met was involved with the EU very early on. And he was heartbroken that Britain is leaving the EU. There’s so much gratitude there. If you think about how many times in history that this has been done – this great act of forgiveness – it’s not that many. One of the other great examples is the South African truth and reconciliation commission, which was another attempt to forgive, to bring back a country into the fold and to understand that blame is pointless in the end and responsibility is key and we’re stronger together than apart. And these are things that reverberate in this film and make it so complex. The British did a lot of quiet, hard work helping to rebuild Germany after the war and I met Germans, too, who remembered that and are very appreciative of what the British did.


Did you meet the author Rhidian Brook? Yes, he came to see us when we were filming and he is lovely. To see his family’s story, his book, being filmed was a wonderful experience for him.


14


We talked about the themes of loss and showing compassion towards refugees. Did that strike you as a very contemporary theme? Yes, absolutely. It’s contemporary because it still goes on and yet it’s as old as the Bible. You must have compassion in your heart and you have to have compassion for your neighbours because these are the things that bind us – our relationships with others; our partners, our families, our neighbourhoods, our country. And that means compassion. There have always been refugees and war but showing compassion shows what we are capable of and the great things that can come of it. They don’t come over night but if you look at what happened from 1945 to 1985 with Germany, that country was ready to take a leading role in the world. And they have taken a lead not just economically but in accepting responsibility as well.


You’ve worked with Keira Knightley before on Everest. Did that help when you worked together on The Aftermath? Keira was my wife on Everest as well and I think we knew each other’s styles really well. I’ve always liked Keira but the last, say five


years, she has gone deeper and deeper. I think she is a fantastic actress and we never over did it; we just sat together, worked together and supported each other. I’ve been fortunate to work with a lot of great actresses – Carey Mulligan, Jessica Chastain, Helen Mirren – and Keira is a great actress and they give you confidence. They give you the confidence to be free together and that works on so many different levels – your emotions, the ability to play, your instincts for how a scene will work – and you can really start to find what is at the bottom of a scene. Keira is easy to work with and brings so much to it. We had some wonderful scenes together. She’s great and like I said, she gives you confidence, gives you space and gives you so much to bounce off of.


You also have some great scenes with Alexander Skarsgård who plays Lubert. Tell us about working with him… Yes, I had lots of great scenes with Alexander. And you know, you can see that Alexander is in the middle of a great patch at the moment, he is very free and open and he is clearly enjoying his career and enjoying his character work as well as his leading man work. He has a lot of choices and he deserves it because he’s a great dude. He really is. I like his philosophy on life – and his philosophy on football teams (laughs). There’s a simplicity and a joy in Alex. He’s a lovely man.


Each film is obviously a different experience and a big part of your life. What was this one like for you? This one was wonderful. We shot this film with a German crew and there were a lot of Germans involved in making this movie and I really enjoyed that. I’ve made a couple of movies in Europe recently and I’ve enjoyed them. And with this particular one, you always want to play a character that you’ve never done before, you want to put these things into your cupboard, and I loved playing this man who found a way to forgive and to be honest with himself. And working with an English and German crew was wonderful. I’m an Australian along for the ride (laughs). There was a lot of love. Movies like this are labours of love for everybody – the director, the art department, the set dressers, costumes, production design – they are not big flashy pay days and it takes everybody involved to get them made and everyone involved was a pleasure and James led the way. This film was a labour of love for me and, I think, for everybody involved and I think that shows up there on the screen.


Read the full interview with Jason Clarke in the March Issue of Live 24-Seven Magazine


LIVE24-SEVEN.COM


CE L EBRI T Y INTERVI EW JASON CLARK E


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132