search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
LIVE 24-SEVEN


YOUNG WINE S OR AGED WINE S


Over the years, at the many trade tastings I've attended, the following scenario has occurred many, many times and it goes something along the following lines... Having perhaps spent the best part of two hours tasting a couple of hundred wines and working our way up from the cheaper end of the market, we then arrive at a section of wines that scream quality, concentration, depth, longevity etc.


We taste the wines, salivate over them, generally get excited and have already in our active imaginations, purchased the wine and sold it on to restaurants so that customers can join in the love we feel for those particular wines...and then the penny inevitably drops and someone in our group (and it has been myself on occasion) will put voice to the nagging truth, which is... ”Yes, but it's far too young to actually put on a wine list” ...and so we walk away, shoulders slightly hunched, lamenting quietly on the one that got away.


104


It is understandable then that sourcing complex, age-worthy wines is not a priority for many restaurants or retail buyers. After all, there is a huge choice available from the New World, and increasingly from the Old World, that are created to be drunk young and enjoyed for their fruity, easy-going character and broadly speaking the truth is that these wines will form the bulk of most restaurant lists. It is also true that many restaurants and private individuals may want to acquire a few cases of aged and age-worthy bottles and therein lies the crux of the problem: who is going to pay for all that time a wine spends hanging around in a cellar, wherever that may be, waiting to come to full maturity?


Many producers would love to keep wines back until they are fully mature, but the truth is that this practice would bring swift financial ruin. Likewise, most merchants would love to build up a bank of wines to bring forward when they are at their peak, but few continue to do this now as it represents a lot of capital tied up indefinitely. Therefore, if the economics of lovingly caring for and nurturing wines until they are ready for drinking do not work for producers and wine merchants, then it follows that restaurants are equally unable to invest in wine and sit on a cellar until it comes to maturity. Buying wines to age ties up much needed capital and just to hammer the point home, it's dead money, at a time when it’s clear we all have to continue to tighten our belts somewhat.


The solution? It's worth bearing in mind that even though a


young wine may come across as being a little too tannic and structured when drinking on its own, that same firmness and structure can actually be a blessing with some foods. As long as a wine has enough fruit to support the acidity and tannin, it can work really well with rich, hearty food, especially if the oak is not too dominant. If you are serving with more delicate food then the wine may be too overpowering, in which case it makes much more sense to opt for the same wine, but from a more 'forward' and less prestigious vintage. I am an absolute advocate for drinking so called 'lesser' vintages from the same vineyard; the cost is substantially less and yet these wines often drink better in the short term.


Arguably, in many instances a wine's youth is not a problem as trends show that the taste for the general public is for wines that are fresh and upfront.


Many merchants have and offer occasional 'lots' of museum stock (I have some myself) and it's well worth asking the question. This route affords a welcome flexibility into how much you buy and it is much easier on the pocket to purchase a case of mixed case of more mature wine without having to finance the wine for years before you have the pleasure of drinking it. Be aware though that the more you spend on an aged bottle, the more attention you should pay to its condition and provenance – ullage level, where it has come from, where it has been stored etc.


LIVE24-SEVEN.COM


WINING & DINING WINE EXPER T


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132