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Local History


preserving the memory of the CF-104 Super Starfighter, its pilots, maintenance and service personnel, along with those who served on air bases where the aircraft were operated. Beyond that, it has another, far more serious pur-


pose. “We're trying to educate the public about Canada's


role in NATO during the Cold War and beyond,” says Steve Pajot, curator and operations manager of the museum. “We feel that people don't understand that we were actually in a war, and there were people killed, including pilots and other personnel.” Pajot and colleagues are in the process of restoring


an old CF-104 Starfighter flown by the RCAF and sold to the Danish military many years ago. Another CF-104 Starfighter is mounted on a pedestal


outside the 17 Wing gate on Air Force Way. The F-104 set numerous world records, includ-


ing both airspeed and altitude records. Its design predecessor, the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter, is a single-engine, supersonic interceptor aircraft, which later became widely used as an attack aircraft. It was originally developed by Lockheed for the United States Air Force, but was used by US Allies around the world and was produced by several other NATO nations. Te Starfighter was operated by the air forces of more than a dozen nations from 1958 to 2004. Its design team was led by Kelly Johnson, who went on to lead or contribute to the development of the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird and other Lockheed aircraft. Te CF-104 Starfighter (CF-111, CL-90) was a modi-


fied version of the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter super- sonic fighter aircraft. Built in Canada by Canadair under licence, it was designed as an interceptor but primarily used as a ground attack aircraft. Te McDon- nell Douglas CF-18 Hornet replaced it in the 1980s. Tose who flew and loved the aircraft called it the


“Silver Sliver” or, most commonly, “the Zipper”, says Pajot. “Tere was an RCAF demonstration team for


Crossword


ACROSS 1. "Te lady ___ protest..." 5. "I Adore Mi Amor" singers Color Me ____


9. Comic actress Anne 14. Crucifix letters 15. Natural burn remedy 16. Stays in neutral 17. Rare-earth metal 19. Has an intense craving (for) 20. "It's down to either me ___" 21. Feeling of foreboding 23. Work an aisle, slangily 25. Not at all extraordinary 30. "My heart's in overdrive and you're behind the ____" (Dark- ness lyric)


33. "Keep quiet!" 35. Mr. Rogers 36. More or less 37. McAn of shoes 39. TV's DeGeneres 42. Priory of ____ (religious group) 43. Down from a duck 45. Bus. bigwig 47. Plus 48. Actress in "Green Card" (1990) 52. Powerpoint alternative, for Mac users


53. Part of Mao's name 54. Check presenter 57. Spanish buddy 61. Greek island 65. Tears 67. Perfunctory 68. Baum books' princess 69. Nursemaid to the Darlings 70. Eastern disciplines 71. "Blue" entity, on a TV cop show 72. Go to and fro


DOWN 1. Fred's pet 2. Dilly 3. "Aeneid" setting 4. Went into seclusion 5. Word from Emeril


Winter 2018


6. What to put on something to keep it quiet?


7. Sullen 8. Humiliate 9. Gets moldy 10. URL ending 11. Green and Gore 12. Part of A.A.R.P. (abbr.) 13. Jerk 18. Jazzman Lateef 22. Ballpark figure (abbr.) 24. Roll-call response 26. Greek R's 27. Obsolescent roof topper 28. ___with it: proceed 29. Savanna grazer 30. Poor, as workmanship 31. Cath. or Prot. 32. Sat and did nothing 33. Filet mignon, e.g. 34. Buff


Answers on next page www.deerlodgefoundation.ca Life.Times 13


38. Word on Chinese menus 40. Prefix with skeleton 41. Former speaker Gingrich 44. Looks into again, as a case 46. Romero who played Te Joker 49. Kingston Trio hit 50. Island that's now called Sri Lanka


51. Day-long race place 55. ___-E (one-time N.W.A. member) 56. Patrol in the provinces, for short 58. "... ____ a putty tat!" 59. Rowlands of "A Woman Under the Influence"


60. Start of "The Star-Spangled Banner"


61. State segment (abbr.) 62. Milne marsupial 63. Heart test letters 64. It may be served with crumpets 66. Cockney's noggin


Annotate Anted Burro Cease Celled Chasten Chums Cringe Crossest Declare Divided


Dreams Endings Faculties Felonies Fetid Fifty Fundamentalism Gifts Girths Habits Hares


Suduko


Hassling Holly Humans Metes Parity Pearl Publish Quieting Rancid Runny Saris


Sincere Sites Smoky Specifications Spoke Sympathetically Taker Targeted Tose Tuner


Steve Pajot in front of his passion project, the CF-104 Starfighter he and colleagues are restoring at the Cana- dian Starfighter Museum at St. Andrews Airport.


many years that called themselves the Deadeye Zips. The USAF always called the Starfighter the Zipper because of its speed.” Pajot, whose father was in the RCAF, has been spell-


bound by Starfighters since his early youth. He recalls watching the slender, needle-nosed CF-104 Starfight- ers shoot down the runways during takeoffs at 4 Wing Baden-Soellingen, Germany, and at CFB Cold Lake. Now a retired Air Canada mechanic, he and his brother and father built a 10-foot scale model Starfighter several years ago. Tat model is now on display at the National Air Force Museum at CFB Trenton. Te aircraft he is now restoring was purchased in 2011


from a retired United States Air Force officer. Pajot says he works on the plane at least eight hours a day, four times a week. “Working on this plane is my passion.” Besides the missile-shaped, stubby-winged Star- fighter, the museum also features a complete Canadair


CAE F-104 Operational Flight and Tactics Trainer (flight simulator), a separately mounted Orenda J79-OEL-7 afterburning turbojet, the Canadian Starfighter’s power plant, and an ejector seat. Te Orenda J79-OEL-7 is capable of 15,800 pounds of


thrust with the afterburner. “Tis was a 1960s aircraft built for a nuclear strike,” says Pajot. “It could slice through high turbulence.” Thirty-seven Canadian pilots lost their lives flying this aircraft. Pajot and colleague Russ Watson, who operates the


museum, currently offer tours by appointment only. For more information, or to book a tour, visit http://www. canadianstarfightermuseum.ca/ A version of this article was originally published in Te


Voxair, the Winnipeg Military Community News. Deer Lodge Centre Life.Times thanks Te Voxair for permis- sion to reprint the article here. To read Te Voxair, visit www.TeVoxair.ca


Word Search


Starfighter Museum a labour of love L


Martin Zeilig


ocated in a private hangar at the St. Andrews Airport, 25 kilometres north of Winnipeg, the Canadian Starfighter Museum is dedicated to


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