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ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:OCTOBER/NOVEMBER


Goodfellow Tyres


After the long hot summer, get ready for winter! Drop in and see us for your free winter health check.


TYRES  BATTERIES  EXHAUSTS WHEEL ALIGNMENT  WHEEL BALANCING


Goodfellow Tyres - South Street - Cockermouth - CA13 9RU TEL: 01900 823600 - WWW.GOODFELLOWTYRES.COM


COCKERMOUTH ALLOTMENT & GARDEN ASSOCIATION


The weather continues to present challenges for gardeners as the daylight hours are shortening with two named storms in September.


Storm Desmond


was the fourth named storm of 2015 and that was early December! We should all wonder what this autumn and winter weather will be like and how we may mitigate some of the problems it can cause.


Those of us with greenhouses, particularly older types where the glass is held in with clips can further secure the glass with extra clips or removing the glass and then bonding it to the greenhouse frame with glazing silicone. If you are considering a new greenhouse, then look for one with full length capping for all the glass, as this is much more resilient to wind damage. This can be an extra on the budget models but is worth it.


Some fences have suffered damage in the recent winds. Lots of fences have 75x75mm timber posts which are just over half the area of a 100x100mm post. Thus, a 100x100mm post should prove to be stronger and more durable. Always buy fence posts that are pressure treated rather


WWW.THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


than dip treated, as the pressure treated will have the preservative all through the post due to the treatment process and the treatment on a dip treated post will only penetrate a short way thus making it more susceptible to rot. If you are in a windy or exposed situation, then look to swap your solid fence for one which will allow the wind through. The alternative would be to return to the old solution of planting a hedge. A hedge will require clipping but will not blow down or need staining. A hedge can be a good security barrier and also a haven for wildlife, attracting birds and beneficial insects. A hedge can be established to a reasonable height over a few years and will last much longer than a fence.


We will expand on the types of hedge and their benefits and potential problems next month.


Our next meeting will be on Tuesday 30th October, at The Swan Inn on Kirkgate at 7.15pm for 7.30pm. Come along and join us to talk about all things gardening.


cagassociation@btinternet.com CHURCHES


TOGETHER ON REMEMBRANCE SUNDAY


Churches in Cockermouth will be uniting, with many people across our town, to commemorate the centenary of Armistice Day 1918 – the Centenary.


At 10.30am, there will be a special service at All Saint’s Church, during which we will unite with our nation for the Two Minutes Silence at 11.00am. As well as remembering the fallen, we will reflect together on Jesus’s reign of peace, praying especially for those places in our world where there is still war and oppression.


At 1.00pm, there will be a short service at Lorton Street Methodist Church. Here, the names of the fallen, inscribed on the Cockermouth War Memorial, will be read out against a backdrop of film footage and still images from World War I. Following this, a procession will leave from Lorton Street to the War Memorial.


At 2.00pm, we will hold our annual Service of Remembrance at the War Memorial.


All are welcome to any of these services. Also, look out for the ‘There but Not There’ figures which will appear around the town in the days before Remembrance Sunday.


Godfrey Butland ISSUE 430 | 18 OCTOBER 2018 | 37


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