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ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:OCTOBER/NOVEMBER


PARKINSON’S WEST CUMBRIA CONCERT!


PUBLIC SUPPORT NEEDED FOR


Christmas Party Nights Menu inspired from festive dishes from around the world


On Sunday, October the 28th a concert is to be presented in St. John’s Church, Washington Street, Workington by Leyland Brass Band in aid of Parkinson’s West Cumbria Branch. One in five hundred people in the UK suffer from this condition.


To present this concert with the Leyland Brass Band, we need to raise £2,200 to cover the costs of the Band, which in turn means that ALL ticket monies raised on the night will go to Parkinson’s West Cumbria Branch.


Tickets cost £10.00.


I hope you will support this event and help raise awareness of Parkinson’s Disease in West Cumbria.


Starter Options Polish Pierogi


Australian BBQ’d Prawns Spanish White Onion Soup


Mains Options Cuban Pork Loin


French Beef Bourgignon Mexican Bacalao Stew (salted cod) Italian Petivier (v)


Traditional Christmas Dinner (vegetarian available)


Dessert Options Italian Panettone


Thanking you in advance for your generosity. Bob Hardon


Tel: 01900 873600, 01900 67621 Email: rghardon43@hotmail.co.uk


French Bûche de Noël (Christmas log) German Stolen Christmas Pudding


To book your party call: 01900 823446 • email: manon.plouffe@hotmail.co.uk Facebook: wildzucchinis • 17 Station Street, Cockermouth, Cumbria CA13 9QW


Ramblings from My Garden


As I’m writing this, the first hints of autumn colour are appearing in the hedgerows. In another few weeks, the blaze of oranges, golds and reds will be in full swing. If your garden lacks a bit of colour at this time of year, now is the time to go looking for inspiration, so you can add plants now for next year. This week that’s just what I’ve been doing.


In a few weeks, my move back to Cockermouth will have happened and I get to start all over again in a new garden. I’m really looking forward to creating a shade garden for the first time. I have a dark, shady area on one side of the new house, so at last I have the chance to plant an entire area with shade dwellers that I love – and my list is long!


First on my list, a bright Acer to lift the gloom. The only thing for it was a research outing to find a large Acer with bright, lime green leaves but also some lovely autumn colour. I’ve settled on Acer shirasawanum ‘Autumn Moon’ and although I won’t be ready to buy and plant it until spring, now is the time of year to make those comparisons and decisions. It’s definitely on my list.


A more pressing job is to plant a new hedge. Autumn is the perfect time to plant bare-rooted and root- balled hedging that will be dug out of the ground as you order it. This is much more economical than buying pot grown plants but it can only happen in winter months when the plants become dormant. I’m hoping that my new yew hedge will create a


WWW.THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK Helen Laidlow


glossy, evergreen backdrop to my borders. With any luck, by the time you read this I’ll be getting stuck into removing straggly, woody shrubs and digging up their roots in preparation for my new arrivals – the hard work begins!


As lots of plants are beginning to look faded and brown, here are some fiery reds that will dazzle in October:


Acer palmatum ‘Osakazuki’ – the best of the Japanese acers to create a fiery red showpiece.


Euonymus alatus – there are many varieties of this shrub that all transform from dark green to vivid red at this time of the year.


Acer rubrum ‘Brandywine’ – taller and faster growing than the Japanese acers, this is a cheaper alternative to achieve striking red foliage in autumn.


ISSUE 430 | 18 OCTOBER 2018 | 35


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