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ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:OCTOBER/NOVEMBER


HOW TO CHALLENGE PIP ASSESSMENT ~ CITIZENS ADVICE ALLERDALE ~


“I have a long-term health condition, but I recently had my Personal Independence Payment (PIP) reduced after a re-assessment. I want to challenge the decision - where do I start?”


There are two stages to challenging your PIP assessment decision. The first stage is known as mandatory reconsideration and involves asking the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to take a second look at your assessment decision.


Normally, you’ll need to contact the DWP within a month of your assessment decision being made and it’s best to do so in writing. Under some circumstances, you can ask for mandatory reconsideration up to 13 months from your assessment decision date.


Your letter should list all the reasons why you don’t think your PIP award should be reduced. Make sure you provide evidence to back up each point you make, such as practical examples, medical records and supporting letters from specialists who are treating you.


If you don’t have the required evidence available, you can submit it separately at a later date.


Once the DWP has looked again at your assessment decision, you’ll receive a Mandatory Reconsideration Notice which says if your request has been successful or not. If it is, your original award will be reinstated and your payment backdated.


If you’re unsuccessful, you could choose to progress to the second challenge stage. This is where you appeal your assessment decision by taking your case to tribunal.


Wedding Fayre Sunday 4th November 2018


12 noon - 4pm


If you need help challenging a PIP decision, contact Citizens Advice Allerdale, Town Hall, Oxford Street, Workington on 01900 604735, or visit www.citizensadviceallerdale.org.uk.


FREE ENTRY with mulled wine & mince pies


for more information call 017684 82444 www.lakedistricthotels.net/innonthelake/weddings


Feather Touch Brows for £200 Includes perfection visit Embleton


Natural and elegant results | Feel younger and look polished Add fullness to over-plucked brows | Create brow symmetry


BEFORE & AFTER BEFORE & AFTER


Instead of a speaker, the members and guests of Embleton WI enjoyed listening to a delightful programme of songs from the 1940s, 50s and 60s, performed by the singer Becca White. Titles


included ‘Sentimental Journey’, ‘Heartbeat’, ‘Hound Dog’ and ‘In the Mood’. Despite turning on the Mirror Ball no- one plucked up the courage to get up and ‘boogie’ but there was lots of toe-tapping and one member was seen doing the ‘hand jive’. Our president Andrea Cameron thanked Becca for a lovely evening’s entertainment on behalf of us all.


The competition for ‘A Head Scarf’ was won by Evelyn Chester and Christine Milliken was second. The raffle was won by one of our guests.


On 14th November, we will be holding our Annual General Meeting and Pie and Pea Supper.


Meetings are held at 7.30pm at the village hall on the second Wednesday of each month. We are always pleased to welcome guests and new members, so please get in touch with our Secretary Joanna South on 01900 828110 for more information.


Maggie Grant


To book your FREE consultation Contact Liz on 07852 165 873


Fully qualified, insured and registered cosmetic tattooist working above Olive Tree Beauty


2nd Floor, 18A Main Street, Cockermouth WWW.THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK KESWICK BRIDGE CLUB


Free tasters and tuition available in October


If you are interested, please contact Joan Taylor on 01768 773176 or 07758 779 120


John Robinson, Committee Member Keswick Bridge Club ISSUE 430 | 18 OCTOBER 2018 | 23


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